Alwright... I dropped the hammer on a new build

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by lewisboats, Nov 29, 2014.

  1. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    If you have read my Table Saw thread you have seen the strips I was cutting... those are for the keel and Stem/Stern for this...

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    18.6 ft LOA
    5.5 ft Beam
    Max Displacemnt 1000 lbs
    200 lbs internal ballast + Steel Board
    Draft @1000 lbs 3.25 ft board down, 9 inches board up
    Sail area: Main: 129.5 sf, Lug Mizzen 29 sf, LOM Mizzen 20.25 sf



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    Ends of the 12' long keel strips. They will alternate rather than have the same grain orientation.
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    I hope to glue up the 3 major components in the basement this winter. I am also going to finish my Annabelle Skiff this winter so I can use it next spring and so I can concentrate on this biggest and most complicated build yet.
     
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  2. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    Looks good. Go for it. :)
     
  3. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    All right! Fun to watch!
     
  4. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Looks good indeed. Why not a daggerboard? Would be much more simple to build, lover down and raise up, and would leave you more space on board.
     
  5. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    Pivoting boards can be very handy sometimes. Daggerboards have their advantages, but so do centreboards. Both have drawbacks too.
     
  6. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Most of my boats have DBs with a couple of LBs thrown in. This will be my first pivoting CB and it will also be a part of the ballast being around 75-85 lbs of solid steel. The case will be part of the support for the folding rowing stations also, so it needs to be fairly long along the centerline. I've thought a lot about this... although the final shape of the Center board is still up for grabs.
     
  7. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    After 2 days of soaking, this is the result for the stem laminations... a success I would say as these bends easily fall within the needed parameters:

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    You can see my soaking tube in the background. They went back in after the test. The lams are 5/16" alternating 1/4 sawn, Rift sawn and flat sawn. Show are the two hardest to bend... 1/4 and Rift. I have translated my points so I can draw the outer stem to something useable and will be drawing the curve within the next 24 hours. I'll bend a lam to double check, but I have no doubt it will work. Next up is creating the form to dryon, then laminate the layers against. Then it is on to the aft stem curve and keel. Then I must wait for epoxy weather to continue. I need to trim down my pieces to within 1/8" of final width too, before soak and bend them for real.
     
  8. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    I have been eagerly devouring the videos of Geoff Kerr building a Caladonia Yawl on Off Center Harbor (40 vids and counting) and I expect I will be using many of the same techniques as I can quickly run in and review to make sure I am not stepping on any dangling things. The vids are about as near a building course as you can get. That along with the videos of building a lapstrake dinghy on YouTube plus Ian's book and One other that I have that I don't have the name handy are going to be my guidelines in this build. I didn't get the mold lines drawn up over the holiday so I'll be doing that tomorrow or Sunday if possible.
     
  9. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    I'm in a real quandary... I got all over artistic and started playing around to see what she would look like with a few more strakes... now I think I like it a lot better with double the strakes. What do you think. It came out a few inches longer, with a few other little tweaks to better fit the additional strakes. This has more planks but the garboard strake would be a lot less work and worry to fit properly. Take a look and tell me what you think. I already spent quite a bit of time fairing the bearding line so all I would have to do is re-run the offsets and translate them to be where I am sitting now with the other iteration of the hull.


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    VS:

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  10. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Some progress today and some retrograde too. We (my son) decided we (I) will build the 6 strake version. Started laying out the Stems today to make templates.

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    Of course I had the main line laid out before I thought to take a picture but here you can see the beard line between the inner and outer stems. The nails depict the inside of the inner stem and the outside of the outer.

    I determined the inner and outer keel lines by taking the perpendicular of the main keel, and measuring 2" over to the inner face of the inner stem, then moving the rule to where it intersected a station at 2", keeping the rule perpendicular to the beard line. The picture shows it better than the explanation.

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    Then I measured 3" out for the outer stem's face. This is only a rough dimension right now... but probably what it will be.

    Springing the batten here to trace the curves.

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    After that was done then I proceeded to lay out the aft stem... and ran into a major issue. It is too curvacious. I can't spring a 1/4" x 1 1/4" batten around the curve so there is no way I can manage my 5/16" stock. I'll have to rework the buttock and ease the curve by a couple of inches at the apex or I'll have to rework my stock down to 1/8" thick to get it to take the bend. I think I'll take a whack at the Buttock... Its been a tiny little niggle in the back of my mind anyway... it just looked a little too sharp of a corner. The other version has an easier curve to it and I think I'll nudge it to match more closely.

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    The spacing between the verticals is 1 1/2"

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  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Beeooteefull! Happy New Year!
     
  12. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Thank you Hoyt!

    I reworked the Buttock lines for the keel/stem area and got what I think will work. It affected the trim a tad so I had to account for that. I filled in the garboard area, which thinned the keel out and increased buoyancy a bit aft which affected trim by about .15 degrees (from the 0 point at the rear stem). Got my offsets and after I watch a Tiny House Nation program, off I go upstairs to plot it out.

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  13. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Muy Bueno!!

    Second time around is a charm. It's a little tight but 5/16" wet should bend as well as 1/4" dry, so this looks good.

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    Now it's off to bed.
     
  14. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Nothing really picture worthy but I spent an hour outside freezing my... trimming all the strips down to 2 1/4" wide and cutting 42 4" blocks the same height to use for the bending jig. I spent $60 at Menards picking up a sheet of 3/4" OSB for the base along with 2x stock to make the blocks out of and a couple of other things. I determined that I can get all the Stem pieces (fore and aft, inner and outer) out of 6' long strips so I'll get a few extra from my 12' strips. I think I have 5 or 6 of those and I'll need every piece. Inner and outer bow stem comes to 5" thick plus the inner stem of the stern is 2" thick. The outer will be built up out of solid timber with maybe one strip laminated onto the inner face to mate with the inner stem. I plan on taking one of my crappy sheets of 1/4" ply and surfacing the OSB with it for a 1" nominal thickness, then coating with plastic sheet, screwing the blocks in place using the template I drew out, then taping the blocks before clamping on several soaked pieces to pre-bend and dry out. I'll do this until I have enough pieces to at least do the inner stem. I'll probably leave it on the form after it is cured, plastic it, then laminate the outer stem on top of it so they match. I would do it in one shot but I don't trust myself not to screw it up. If I mess up the inner one then I can do another before wasting more material on the outer.
     

  15. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    I lied... I just remembered the two strips in the basement still soaking. I'll let them dry out some then trim them down to size too.
     
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