Aluminum Mud boat hull (For surface drive outboards)

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Matt Jord, Dec 10, 2019.

  1. Matt Jord
    Joined: Dec 2019
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    Matt Jord Junior Member

    Hi all,

    I'm looking at building a hull with a friend to satisfy our hunting and fishing needs. We have decided that we want to design something that will perform well with a surface drive outboard (pro drive, gator tail, mud buddy). After doing some research it seems that there are a few "requirements" to have these hulls perform well with this type of power source.
    1.) 0-10 degree dead rise
    2.) approximately 15 degree transom angle
    3.) Transom height to match the motor shaft length

    Would anybody have recommendations as to how to obtain some CAD's for the aluminum cutting?
    Any other recommendations to make sure this boat performs well? What am I missing in regards to my measurements and requirements listed above? Any info is appreciated.
     
  2. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I would like to help you and I have the experience and the means to do it. Could you give more details of what you have and what you need? Of course, if all you need is the information for numerical control cutting of already defined parts, the work would be simple.
    PM me if you are interested.
     
  3. Matt Jord
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    Matt Jord Junior Member


    I could definitely use some help on the process. I have a pulsed MIG welder that I plan on using for the entire project.
    I assume I can CNC cut the bottom (5086 3/16") and then cut the sides (5086 1/8") and then weld together. I'm hoping to use one solid piece of Al for the bottom, and cut another solid piece for both sides. Does this sound correct?

    What should I be using for the transom?
    What about the angle of the bow? Where should my flat bottom begin curving to the bow?
    I'm not sure of the order of operations on all of this, how to make stringers, chines, gunnels and all the "smaller" stuff.

    I'd like to think I would find a way to make it all work out in the end but I'd like to do this correctly. I've probably been researching Al boat building for a year, and welding Al for about the same amount of time. I'm not knowledgeable enough to just buy the metal and start cutting.

    Any guidance is appreciated. Looking to get anywhere from 16'-18' OAL hull
     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Depends on the size of sheets you buy and whether you have the facilities to handle these large sheets.
    That's it.
     
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  5. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    There are several companies that are dedicated precisely to selling information to build boats of these characteristics. They offer drawings, assembly instructions, bill of materials and all the information required to build their boats and at very reasonable prices. You can find it on the web. In the unlikely event that you do not find anything similar to what you want or that cannot be adapted to something of the existing, I would gladly help you to materialize your design.
     
  6. Matt Jord
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    Matt Jord Junior Member

    I have access to a machine shop where I could CNC and press brake the sheets.
     
  7. Matt Jord
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    Matt Jord Junior Member

    I have looked and reached out to many different makers. For some reason the manufacturers of the "mud hull" are very lucky about the information they give out. Check out Timber Creek boats online, supposedlyt handcut everything.

    I'm looking for a more simplistic way to complete my first build. I'd prefer to get the aluminum professionally cut so I don't have to potentially mess up a very expensive piece of metal.
     
  8. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Then the thing is as simple as drawing with any CAD program the pieces already defined, if the information they provide is correct. Check with the workshop that has the CNC cutter what formats of drawing files is able to read the machine and how they should receive the information to perform the automatic cutting.
     
  9. Matt Jord
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    Matt Jord Junior Member

    TANSL,
    Where can I get these CAD's? you said you might be able to help me design something?
    I'd like to get the transom setup in a way similar to the photo attached.
    Big question for me, how do I know the CAD files are reliable and won't eat through a very expensive sheet of Al?
     

    Attached Files:

  10. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    We can make the boat you want, with the transom as you like. But, if there is an error in the cut file it cannot be known until the end. There are many machines that before cutting can make a route, painting instead of cutting, on an aluminum plate, which can help verify the part to be cut. You could also use the file each of each piece to draw with the appropriate plotter each piece on paper or cardboard and check its shapes. Or you can draw them at 1/10 scale, on a carboard, and create a 3D model verifying that all the pieces fit correctly.
    You do not need to have any CAD program. Simply check the type of files that the cnc machine is able to read. I will send you the appropriate files. You can draw a picture of each piece or nest several pieces on the same sheet, which will be cut from an aluminum plate.
    Please contact me, if you wish, through my email to see the information you have at this time : 657677483@orange.es
     
  11. Matt Jord
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    Matt Jord Junior Member



    I tried emailing you, it did not work.
     
  12. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

  13. DogCavalry
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    DogCavalry Senior Member

    This man clearly needs a sea sled
     
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  14. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    I think you might have nailed it there John - maybe he could build a smaller version of yours, but in aluminium?

    Matt, have you had a GOOD look around all the companies online that provide boat plans?
    John's suggestion re a sea sled is good, but if you can just buy a set of plans online that are specifically designed for your intended purpose (or fairly close to it) then that would probably be easier?
    Would a bass type boat be suitable for what you have in mind? Or is the boat in the link below way out in left field?
    Spira International Inc - Skeeter Bass Boat https://spirainternational.com/hp_skee.php
     

  15. DogCavalry
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    DogCavalry Senior Member

    The tx-18 from bateau.com is a sea sled, very much like what you describe, Matt. And the plans come with developable panels because it’s meant for stitch and glue construction.
     
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