Air Inflated Male Mold and Spraying Concrete or FRP with hand cranked Sprayer

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by mtumut, Jun 17, 2016.

  1. mtumut
    Joined: Mar 2005
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    mtumut Junior Member

    I thought an new idea.

    Lets start with the mold. Easy. Cut a plastic thick film just like the exotic hunters room leopard head and skin fur. You can do it measuring the line drawings curves and transforming it to 2d.

    Second inflate it. And spray with hand cranked concrete or chopped fiberglass sprayer . Wait the first layer dries. And apply more.

    I think no investing thousand to plywood and transportation , carrying one by one , cutting loud , lots of unnecessary primitive work.

    I am trying to find a clean solution , no wood used , no dangerous cutting involved , no noise , no transportation , red neck jobs etc etc.

    Put inside of your concrete steel fibers and no meshing necessary.

    Use reactive powder concrete invented in france at 1990 and widespreaded to your country , 80000 psi compressive strenght , and make a concrete hull thinner and lightweight. Only problem steam heat is needed to reach maximum strenght but worse scenario is 3 times more strenght than the second best concrete. Without using heat.

    What do you think ?

    Mustafa Umut Sarac
    Istanbul
     
  2. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    If no one's done it,and you have the idea,why don't you try a small scale one,say 2 meters long and report back?
    Wouldn't cost much
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The hand-cranked sprayer sounds like a job for that red-neck labour !
     
  4. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Imagine he will be pretty fit after hand cranking a concrete pump.:D
     
  5. mtumut
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    mtumut Junior Member

    I saw a hand operated concrete sprayer at a website long time ago , surface finish can be a problem. Here , 30 years ago , that kind of raw , thick sand surfaces were everywhere.
    Workers were carrying concrete buckets to 6th floor at the shoulder. Now even smallest home been built by concrete pump cranes. I am calling red neck job to plywood makers because it forces yourself with the decision of yourself. Not necessary , use your brain and easy the job.

    Hand cranked sprayer is suprisingly efficient and fast.

    But I dont think you can coat a complete hull when all the hull not completed at the exact same time. May be small boats are better.

    I dont know also whether there is a hand cranked fiberglass sprayer. May be it stops working before you finish the hull. I am not sure. I need your help.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Back off from the redneck insults. Some of the most refined boats have been designed and built by rednecks. For example, the Carolina Sportfishermen.
     
  7. serow
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    serow Junior Member

    Do you mean this sort of thing?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ry0MPEZZtJ4

    It's called tyrolean rendering here. [Sorry, didn't realise it said that on the title]

    It's used as both a decorative finish and also to make old walls more waterproof, even though it looks a bit porous here.

    Hard work beckons.
     
  8. mtumut
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    mtumut Junior Member

    Exactly ! Its porous but could be finished by hand with may be wet textile. Its extremelly hard finish.
     
  9. serow
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    serow Junior Member

    I wonder if a powered version and auto fed version is available, so you can concentrate on the finish. This thing looks like you need to stop frequently to reload. [I realise we're getting away from the simplicity here.] You need to build up a thicker finish than are usually applied on walls. This stuff sticks to the brickwork/mortar well, because it's fairly dry as a mix and dries further on impact. You would have difficulty getting a first layer to stick on plastic is my guess but I'm not clear from your description what you had in mind.
    These things are dirt cheap.Give it a go and let us know how you get on.
     
  10. mtumut
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    mtumut Junior Member

    I opened the thread to get the reactions and ideas. I agree with you , plastic and mortar does not go well. Concrete does not stick to plastic.

    I looked to fiberglass sprays. They look better , but air source can be expensive if its not been rented. Spray guns are cheap but thin strips of glass fibers are very expensive - FOR ME -But if you have couple of thousands you can finish a hull in few hours.

    When it comes to inflated mold , when you apply fiber to some area , it deforms the other areas inflated. I think inflated mold must filled with very high pressure and high pressure textile molds would be good for serial production.

    But if you build few small boats for races , such cherubs or moths , this is where fun lies.

    I think that idea for big boats fails.
     
  11. serow
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    serow Junior Member

    Yes, I'm sure its a no no for anything large, but from my experience with mortar and the like one of the main things is continuity and to avoid starting and stopping.

    If you are talking about something like a canoe you could may be build a solid mould out of say 50:1 sand cement, just enough to stop it falling apart, kind of like a kids sandcastle construction but a little more permanent, then cover it with polythene sheet then muslin or an old sheet on top, and spray away, trowel it off, cover it with another sheet, keep it damp while it cures and after a week or so fingers crossed take it off the mould. If it all goes wrong you'll have a solid canoe that weighs half a ton but with luck it will part company.If it doesn't part company and you can turn it over [what are friends for?] you should be able to wash the very weak mould away with a hosepipe or pressure washer.
     
  12. mtumut
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    mtumut Junior Member

    I think , thinking about sand mold is againts the sprit of that thread. Because I want everything mobile and can be rolled.

    I think we come back to plywood again. There is 2mm thick plywoods .. Lets buy 2.4 meters to 1.7 meters long plywood , cut like a mold , coat with fiberglass thin layer and shape the mold WHEN ITS FIBERGLASS STILL WET.

    Wait 48 hours , your male or female mold is ready. OR YOU DONT NEED MOLD , You can USE FIBERGLASS PLYWOOD WET COMPOSITE AS YOUR BOAT.

    I am sorry for big letters but my english is still struggling after 30 years.
     
  13. serow
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    serow Junior Member


  14. mtumut
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    mtumut Junior Member

    I know it but very expensive here and too much heavy but why not ? I heard its been even inflated to house shape. wet canvas is excellent.
     
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