Aftmast rigs???

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by jdardozzi, May 28, 2002.

  1. Spiv
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    Spiv Ancient Mariner

    Fanie,
    you're right, I remember, you had great result with your rig.
    One more proof that it does work.

    I agree with Alik thet forestay tension is important, but good sail performance could also be achieved with designing the sails for 'not so tight' a forestay as they have in the racing rigs.
    In any case, I believe I can achieve good forestay tension as I have two backstays on winches.

    My challenge is with engineering the CF mast. Any FE designers out there??
     
  2. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    Bob Oram is suggesting I go aft (well further than standard design) mast for my "hitch-hiker rig" - but at present I am happy with where it is - as it looks like I am just too lazy/broke to buy/put a standard "mainsail" - but actually I want to use the space for PV solar panels (up to 10kW) - Bob is apparently considering an aft-mast rigged design somewhere down the track...

    I will probably cant the mast aft a bit to get more sail area from the twin genoas and put the centre of effort a bit further aft - just ideas at the moment...
     
  3. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

    my 2 cents

    most of my sailing experience is on 35 to 39 foot bermudan sloop mono hulls with full keel and "barn door" style rudders
    then also PLENTY dinghies and lasers and hoby cats

    i can assure all of you that after i sailed on Fanie's little tri i was completely blown away by it's excelent performance to windward and its ability to tack. Admitted this was on inland waters but it was a gusty blow.

    the system that Mas intends to use with twin head sails is a very good choice for cruising and Fanie's experiment clearly shows that the aftmast concept works exceptionally well - absolutely nothing to worry about :D
     
  4. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Manie, it is common knowledge that cats with 'Prout rig' are more difficult to tack compared with conventional rigged cats. This is because of big genoa that blows out and creates yawing momentum that prevents the tacking motion. Small mainsail is not capable to balance the genoa. Of course, it could be different on different boats depending on many other factors.

    Anyway, this is just talks. Brian's rig should be built and tested before we can make conculsions and actually before it is marketed. He needs at least a 20-30' cat built with this rig... instead of hundreds of pages written on the subject during many years. I mean that prototyping and engineering are important before someone start investing real money in 50-60' boats with this unproven rig.
     
  5. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    I'm building two boats where the aft mast rig goes on. One is a 8m cat the other is a 10m cat. Both will have double aft mast rigs similar to what I had before. Needless to say there are changes, but not much.

    I don't like referring to this sail as a genoa, a genoa seems to be clumsy and less controllable.

    We should find a proper name for this.
     
  6. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Fanie, but You built a prototype before start building bigger boats. This is right way to go, really appriciated!
     
  7. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Yes well the way things are going here financial wise it seems I'll only get one finished in about 250 or so years :(
     
  8. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Almost makes you wonder how this vessel ever manages to tack or go up wind :rolleyes:
     

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  9. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    I agree Alik, my rig is not to be put on many boats as it needs a good foundation to accept the high loading. Creating this good foundation may add considerable to the engineering and the price of the vessel. So its not for all.

    I wrote a few discussions with reference to a few situations where 'unusually' high loading is involved:
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/sailboats/sail-loading-rig-rig-loading-vessel-2293-6.html#post223385

    Vessel Substructure to Support Rigging Loads
     
  10. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Brian, You have to put big disclaimer on Your website saying that these concepts have never been built.

    For years, You are talking about these 'aft mast rigs' instread of building and testing a prototype. Sorry to say, but without engineering, prototyping and testing Your ideas have zero value.

    As to the photos You post above - completely different situation, pls note the position of mainsail to CLR of boat.
     
  11. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Reference Posting #7 above
    ...for a moment look at the profile drawing of my rig and picture it as though the mast was standing straight up vertically with its masthead in the same location as mine now is. Contrary to Tom’s statement, my forestays are really no longer than a conventional sloop rig, in fact they are likely shorter. And his comments about the angles between the backstay & the mast and the forestay & the mast are not quite correct. In reality it’s the horizontal (not vertical) component of the tension forces in these two stays that determines the ability of the rig to resist sag in the forestay……my masthead backstay has a more advantageous (rearward pulling) angle than does my forestay pulling forward. Interestingly, this phenomenon was probably most detrimental to the Prout mast-aft rig. Their short vertical mast at the aft position resulted in a highly sloped forestay that was both too long for the rig’s overall height, and it could over-exert a forward pulling force on the masthead that was indefensible by the shallow-angled backstays…..result, big time sag, sails too full. This rig had other problems as well….not an example of a successful mast-aft rig, but a case study in some things to avoid.
     
  12. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    It is not, it is sailing downwind faster than the wind :D:D:D:D:D
     
  13. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member


    Talking again... Show us the boat!!! :D
     
  14. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    I'm unsure as to what you are insinuating here...the balance of the CE over the CLR, I assume??

    Are you claiming the main on the tri is of a larger area than my mizzen, and located more rearward, and that is more balanced?

    If you look at my original design I think you will find that me CE for my full rig (all 3 sails), and the CE for the combo genoa/mizzen (2 sails) are both very close to one another fore-to-aft. and both are almost directly over the CLR of my centerboard

    ..and you might also refer to the illustrations in posting #98 above
     

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  15. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    The geometric CLR/CE relation is basic thing and it seems correct from Your sketch. To be accurate, this is simplified repersentation that works only for proven rigs. I mean that CE of sails will move during tacking motion of boat, and this will seriousely effect tacking performance.

    I say again: reference to posts, guesswork and basic geometry are not sufficient to prove feasibility of this rig. Show us working boat, at least a dinghy, with Your rig!
     
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