Aesthetic and ergonomic in boat design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Sailcy, Oct 27, 2016.

  1. Sailcy
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    Sailcy Junior Member

  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    That's a pretty ridiculous position to attempt to justify, don't you think?
     
  3. Sailcy
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    Sailcy Junior Member

    If it looks good, it will fly good!
    And if you create something make it beautiful, it will not cost you more.
    I believe this old statements are still important today.
    It's a shame to see that some of boat designers produce project after project even on a weekly basis just ignoring even basic ergonomic principles.
    Its lack of knowledge or hope to sell at least something? Or both...
     
  4. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    ... and even ignoring basic ships theory and/or naval architecture principles.
     
  5. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    The first time you try to build a boat on a budget, you realize how easily sharp edges, flat panels and non-exotic wood become sexy and attractive. ;)
     
  6. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    "If your houseboat uses a surplus Port-O-Potty for a toilet ... you might be a Redneck."
     
  7. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    Because Google doesn't really sort things that way. People do. Google presented you with the results it likes. If you have the proper skill set, it may not cost that much more to pull off better shapes. The boats that actually get built are usually well suited and pleasing. If you look at what we ask Google, and compare it to what we actually do, make, or buy; Google must think we are all crazy. You could look at books of boat plans that have been reviewed by professionals.

    http://www.woodenboatstore.com/product/book_100_Boat_Designs_Reviewed/design
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2016
  8. Sailcy
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    Sailcy Junior Member

    "If you have the proper skill set, it may not cost that much more to pull off better shapes.."
    Yes I agree.The problem is to get the proper skill set which may take years!
    Apart from aesthetic which could be argued as individual perception, the ergonomic is created around the human body to be as much functional, convenient and safe. I could not see why boats ergonomy should be considered less important than for example stability calculations. If someone injured himself at sea because of incorrect seating angle or inconveniently located steps who will take the responsibility?
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    In the USA that would be distributed between the designer, builder and seller.
     
  10. jorgepease
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    jorgepease Senior Member

    If the boat industry were more like the auto industry that would happen... A proper skill set combined with desire to produce a better product and intimate knowledge of boating is, in my opinion, the best bet for now.
     
  11. Sailcy
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    Sailcy Junior Member

    Speaking about the boat industry, it's more or less clear. They use proper Naval Architects to create a comprehensively sound vessel. Its about thousands and thousands diy builders who mainly use just a yacht designer created plans to get their dream come true. I want to believe that most designers are honest and experienced people properly trained. But at these days anyone could call himself a designer and trying convince the public that his product is the best
     
  12. jorgepease
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    jorgepease Senior Member

    I don't see aesthetic and ergonomics to be the focus of the architects responsibility. That's where a company (builder) with a vision comes into play. Like SIG for example - very careful attention to a specific market. That's not to say the architect can't have the vision but is he going to take responsibility for selling the boat? I doubt it unless he is the mfg/architect.
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Anybody could call himself a designer since the start of time. There is no specific requirements to be one. A Naval Architect or Mechanical Engineer has to pass exams to be certified as such.
     
  14. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    For some reason, along the "-anyone can call himself" lines, I'm reminded of how -- on Yes, Minister -- Sir Humphreys used to occasionally give Hacker guff for the school he went to.

    Also: back to the OP and like auto industry comment, this has been done. At some level still is being done. So-called "standard boats" pioneered in the early 20th included such absolutely lovely wooden things as Lake Union "dream boats" and I sure wish I could land some plans for those long and lean Red Wing (standardized) paddlewheel cruisers ... because they were gorgeous (and you gotta figure they had worked through many potential problems that could be a nice jumping off point for updating to modern engines and construction ... but keeping the lines).
     

  15. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    Rofl... so true.. same has happened on cars.
     
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