Adams motorsailer

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by loucarboni, Sep 19, 2015.

  1. loucarboni
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    loucarboni Junior Member

    Im on the hunt for for plans and specs for an Adams 36 pilothouse motorsailer
    To be built in grp using a female mould
     
  2. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    MIT in Boston USA has a library of boat plans , fairly cheap.

    Also Mystic Museum in CT also has a plans library.

    Good hunting.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Female mould ? Surely not.
     
  4. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

  6. loucarboni
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    loucarboni Junior Member

    The Adams36 is a double chine boat and therefore smaller panel widths.
    I intend to build a female mould using 6mm masonite .this method was used by bruce Roberts some time ago .I have produced a few hulls using this method .
    The result is a very fair hull with very little sanding required,
    I obviously have to reduce the displacement of the hull and take advantage of a lighter hull, as a posed to increasing ballast or tankage
    Ill be using Gerr's specs for the layup
    Cheers
     
  7. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    Here's one ready to go, http://www.tradeboats.com.au/detail/marine/boats/adams/traditional-36/322336

    That tooling might well be sitting around somewhere.... thing I'd just buy that one & cut out all the fun of building...

    Loucarboni, the contact molding in a temporary mold can be good, done plenty myself off melamine sheet & we did use masonite back in the day, with shellac to seal, a few plasticine joins, johnsons floor wax & some pva wiped on with a sponge....

    Jeff.
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    OK so there are round bilge glass versions, the multi-chine is obviously for steel, huge job to be making a mould imo, but if the enthusiasm level is high.......
     
  9. loucarboni
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    loucarboni Junior Member

    Not so big a job .i did a simple single chine 12metre hull. 3weeks to build the mould and about a week to lay up and install bulkheads. Building a one off round bilge hull is out of the question as I couldnt handle the endless boging and sanding. This way I get a fair hull ready for painting.and the visable chins are acceptable being a motor sailor
    Also radius chines can be appleid to soften it up
    A few years ago i built a motor sailer to qld survey. I constructed a female mould for the whole deck including trunk cabin and wheelhouse. It was very successful
    It was a challenge though.
     
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  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Good point about radiusing the chines, easy enough to accomplish I guess. How about the stiffness of it, in single skin glass ? Or are you thinking of a cored boat ?
     
  11. loucarboni
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    loucarboni Junior Member

    I intend to build single skin.most of the hull panels have some curviture but will be stiffened
    By top hat stringers. The design has 3 major b'heads ,two of which enclose the engineroom.
    This will provide good tortional stiffness
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    My memories of masonite are of a material that is not that stable in changing moisture conditions, so you are going to get my vote if you can get a nice straight boat out of that mould, especially out of doors, good luck with it.
     
  13. loucarboni
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    loucarboni Junior Member

    Unlike standard 4mm masonite, tempered 6mm is a very stiff material.boat to be constucted under cover for obvious reasons.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    How are you joining it, butt joints ?
     

  15. loucarboni
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    loucarboni Junior Member

    Correct 3 butts either side .hardly noticable if care taken.
     
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