A question of packing boxes.

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by LP, Apr 8, 2007.

  1. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    A less glamorous topic in the sailor's world, but a necessity none the less. I guess most of my reading leaves me with questions about the whole propeller shaft, stuffing box, support bearing set-up.

    While browsing on store catalogs for needed marine hardware I ran across these cool chocks that I'll probably put on my runabout project.

    http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/series.aspx?id=38

    But, I saw links to packing boxes and felt the need to remove gray area from the grey area. In this product,

    http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/series.aspx?id=181

    It looks to me that the flanges would bolt to the deadwood in a traditionally built craft.(?) I never really thought about it before, but this would mean that the shaft alley through the deadwood exposed to water continuously and accommodations for that fact must be dealt with. (?) Or, would you use another packing box where the shaft exits the deadwood? I'm not sure that makes sense, but there would be a need for a support bearing of some sort. (?) Examples?

    For a shaft that exits through the lower hull, would this be a servicable device?

    http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/series.aspx?id=182

    or this?

    http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/series.aspx?id=177

    As a matter of curiousity, where would this fit in application?

    http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/series.aspx?id=173

    I know this isn't a stellar topic of conversation. Knowing how to keep the water on the right side of the hull is always a good topic though. I certainly appreciate any insights into this lowly topic.
     
  2. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    The packing is seldom used as a bearing , although there are work boats that do use thiswith 15 or 20 packing rings.

    The shaft is located by either a bearing at the aft end of the deadwood (cutlass with own water scoop) or an internal bronze bearing , and strut w/cutlass before the prop.

    Yes, water IS in the shaft alley , all the way to the end of the heavy hose and stuffing.

    FF
     
  3. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    Next question.

    I'm finding information on cutlass bearings. I've found struts for holding the bearing. But, I've not found any sort of component that would hold the bearing in a deadwood arrangement. Would this be a custom machined part to interface between the deadwood and to fit the O/D of the cutlass bearing ?
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The standard arrangement is a cutlass bearing that has two ears or flanges that get screwed to the aft face of the deadwood.
     
  5. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    aft bearing housing

    I feel that I'm looking for the wrong part name or that I just haven't ubbed the lamp the right way so I'm not finding the genie.

    Stearntube? Shaftlog?

    Something like ths?

    http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/catalog.aspx?cid=50&c=Shaft Logs

    Something without upper tube maybe?

    Some links to some good examples would be nice if somebody has the time.

    I can find the packing hardware ok, but the propeller end just isn't jumping out there for me.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A lead tube set in bedding compound was usual until fairly recently. Nowadays they have fiberglass tubes that are easier to use.
     
  7. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    One more try.

    Here is what I believe was mentioned.

    http://store.hamiltonmarine.com/browse.cfm/4,12637.htm

    Excuse my ignorance, but the long end points aft and in the case of deadwood, a couple of serious lags to secure the fitting in place?

    Is the tube, lead or fiberglass, in the bedding compound supposed to limit water exposure to the deadwood?
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The tube has the packing gland or stuffing box attached to it. The purpose is mainly to keep water from entering.
     
  9. deepblueyacht
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    deepblueyacht New Member

    I don't know if I have found this thread prior to making any orders, but i can definitly help clarify some questions for you.

    http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/series.aspx?id=181

    this product is generally used in a boat that uses some form of bearing support other then the shaft log, i.e. a strut. This unit is typically used only as a sealling device where there is not much shaft angle and a tight application meaning the engine is close to the hull output of the shaft.

    http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/series.aspx?id=182

    this shaft log is generally used in please boat applications with a strut and is designed for different shaft angles. The only shaft support is the packing box itself and used in conjunction with a strut for shaft support.

    http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/series.aspx?id=173

    This application is designed for boats with some sort of keel where there is not a strut. As this application requires a cutless bearing on one end and a sealing or packing system on the opposite.

    I hope I have helped!

     

  10. bob24
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    bob24 Junior Member

    Shaft log

    Hi;
    In my 27 ft wood sloop I used heavy wall copper tubing. It went thru about 24" of oak. One end of the tube was fitted to the inside stuffing box. I believe it slipped over a nipple on the stuffing box. A similar connection on the other end for the cuttless bearing. I did it about 20 years ago so the details are a little fuzzy. If you leave your boat in saltwater you have to seal the joints good with compound or the teredo worms will have a feast in your wood. A 1/32 gap is too big.
    Bob
     
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