4 to 8 foot model/replica Carolina flare hull

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Jgrainger, Apr 9, 2016.

  1. Jgrainger
    Joined: Apr 2016
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    Location: North Carolina

    Jgrainger New Member

    My son wants to build a 4 to 8 foot Carolina flare model or replica. And I have search the web over trying to find plans for it. It's a project that he and I will be working on together. Any help of where I could purchase or download such a thing from or a name/phone number of someone who might be able to help me would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: North Texas

    Rurudyne Senior Member

  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I think he's looking for the classic bow form:
    [​IMG]
    There are lots of plans available for this hull form.
     
  4. Jgrainger
    Joined: Apr 2016
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    Location: North Carolina

    Jgrainger New Member

    Yes just like the picture above !!! It could even be 3' to 4' my son just wants to build a model yes I can find lager plans but was hoping some could scale on down for him and I..
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Plans for a scale model of any design will do, just pick the appropriate scale you want (12:1, 24:1, etc.) and go from there. In other words, if find plans for a 30' boat that you like, a 1/8th scale model will be 3' 9" long. This means you'd build with1.5" to the foot scale.
     
  6. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    You gotta' do what you gotta' do but the extreme flare will be difficult to model neatly and accurately. It is certainly do able but much work and attention to detail will be needed. It looks like a project for strip building and an application of glass /epoxy at least on the outside. You will need an accurate table saw to cut the strips. Alternatively you could use balsa strips from the local hobby shop. In that case you will want to glass both the inside and the outside.

    A number of our members are model builders (including me). We appreciate the determination and patience that builders must exercise in order to finish the job. Those will be crucial factors for the project

    I commend you for agreeing to work with your son on a project of this kind. That's what great dads do................ P.S. it is both educational and fun for dads too.
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It will, of course, behave rather differently underway to the full size version,(assuming this is to be a working model) especially as there is sharp increase in the dynamic lift component as you shrink it down. Maybe the Carolina flare won't get much use, as it skips over, rather than through the water.
     
  8. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    What are the physics which cause the "sharp increase in the dynamic lift component component as you shrink it down"?
     
  9. Earl Boebert
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Earl Boebert Senior Member

    I strongly recommend carving a small half-hull before tackling a complex form such as the one in the picture. This will not only help you visualize the shape of the final model but will aid in planning how to lay out the planking, which from the looks of the photo is going to be a bit tricky.

    Cheers,

    Earl
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If he builds it to 1:5 scale, with the same waterline position, the full scale version is 125 times the weight, but only 25 times the bottom area, so the "loading" is 5 times as great as the model. For a given speed it will have heaps more lift, although obviously I don't mean if the speed is scaled down exactly, to the same boat lengths/second, say from 25 knots for the full scale, down to 5 knots for the model.
     

  11. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Speed for wave and dynamic effects such as "lift" scales as the square root of size. For the same ratio of dynamic lift to mass a 1:5 ratio scale model boat would need to go at 45% of the speed of the full size boat. That is the scaling used for model testing and was first developed by William Froude in the 19th century. http://www.ivt.ntnu.no/imt/courses/tmr7/lecture/Scaling_Laws.pdf

    Dynamic pressure is proportional to the speed squared. At a speed of 0.447 full size speed the dynamic pressure will be 1/5 of full size dynamic pressure. 1/5 dynamic pressure * 1/25 area = 1/125 dynamic lift.
     
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