4.3L Vortec mercruiser cracked block - swap with automotive engine block?

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by mmanning63, Jun 19, 2010.

  1. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    I have 2 Yanmar 6LP deisels, 250HP each they cost 54 ,000 dollars, with trannys---!!!

    The cam cover label came unstuck and underneath was Toyota. It is a Toyota 1HD engine from the Landcruiser.

    The manual is the same as the vehicle , in some areas there are mistakes such as to remove the viscous fan before removing the water pump and other small mistakes. I was at first angry at 54,000 dollar but now I buy all spares from Toyota, they would not know what a Yanmar was they think your saying Yamaha anyway.

    All tolerances in the manual are same as marine or vehicle.

    Yanmar insisted I bought Yamnar filters saying they were special . I asked why if I wipe the paint off the Yamnar filters it says Toyota? They admitted reluctantly there were the same.

    What we have here is milking the Marine consumer as we know they do.

    There will always be some who believes it and pays 100 dollars for 2 oil filters, cam belts, fuel filters, gaskets all same.

    However I might just check on part numbers on an oil pump or cam shaft should I ever need one.
     
  2. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    I think I once said my old business partner won a trip to Yanmar factory in Japan and he laughed when early in the production line ( yes they assembled the engines) they were grinding off Toyota wherever they found it

    Cat and Cummins parts are the same truck/gen set/ marine less the parts that need IMO approval

    I wonder how GM DD parts will be now that Rolls Royce owns them?
     
  3. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Volkswagon owns Rolls Royce.
     
  4. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

  5. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

  6. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

  7. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Interesting,--won a week in Japan,--what was second prize 2 weeks in Japan?

    I am suspect of grinding off Toyota --mine are not and you say grinding metal with open engines around!!! all that lovely grinding dust in the cams.

    I guess thats the cleverly built in life span solved.
     
  8. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    You know the Japs..all nice and clean?

    maybe the fallback is engines that take 2 minutes to get oil pressure when you start them
    I always thought that was a scam as there is no need for that at all.

    PS a few years ago I went to the Cummins KTA V12 factory in Conventry which is where these engines were built from early days to ?
    Machining blocks and heads is all done under the same roof as assemble and testing.
     
  9. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

  10. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    2 minutes for oil pressure??? thats like none at all. If your referring to me it was 8 seconds!!


    you not prone to slight exaggeration are you?.

    I have pre lube pumps on now --common keep up!
     
  11. broke_not
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    Location: North Dakota

    broke_not Junior Member

    You'll hear all sorts of marine engine nonsense, and the sad part is that much of the confusion is "fed into" by marine mechanics. I don't think all of it is intentionally done to pull the wool over anyone's eyes, but it does seem pretty apparent that a whole lot of marine mechanics don't have much experience outside of the marine arena. Long story short: If they got into the biz and learned from another marine tech about "special this" or "special that", they tend to go with what they've heard.

    A couple of years ago we bought a Bayliner runabout, so I joined a forum for that brand. One of the "senior" forum members posts lengthy replies to just about every question that's asked. Since he's been there forever, (and has undoubtedly provided lots of good info), everything he says is taken as Gospel. When he posted about about special marine engine bearing clearances and such, I questioned him as to why. That was followed by a page-long post containing his theories. When I responded to all of that with .pdf scans of service manual pages from a few different manufacturers that showed the recommended clearances, that was responded to with an indignant reply that I should consult an "old-school" engine guy....and he'd set me straight. The thing is, I learned from an old-school engine guy, and one of the most important things I picked up from him...was separating fact from fiction.

    "I heard...." or "some guy told me....." is wrong a whole lot of the time.

    Buy, borrow, or download a service manual. If you have a part number, look it up on the 'net and see what/where/why it's used. View the word "special" with suspicion....especially when the person you heard it from can provide no details as to why it's special.

    Here's your marine engine "Funny Of The Day": A while back, someone asked here about marine engine valves and valve seats. Someone "in the know", (i.e. a marine mechanic), posted that all marine engines have stainless valves and special seats. The reason he gave was that it keeps moisture and corrosion out of the engine while it's off. Keep in mind that it was a "marine engine guy" that said this.

    I replied by asking how a person gets their engine to stop with all of the valves closed, you know....to keep the engine "sealed up" when it's off. He never replied....which means he's probably still scratching his head.



    :)
     
  12. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    i am suprised a man of your experience didn't know yanmar used toyotas, nanni do as well. yanmar modify them that much that they have few matching parts to the original toyota. i think cams, pistons, rods are different to handle the huge increase in horsepower. the latest yanmars use bmw base engines, i think.
     
  13. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    I just wrote a lengthy post about the manual coming from the vehicle about 6 posts back. I said the tolerances where the same. The only thing that gives more HP is the big turbo they fit, and its not much more than the vehicles.

    You think-- the cams and pistons are different? You think?

    I think your wrong!!
     
  14. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    I think there is some confusion between a DIY marinizing their own engine (and the reasonableness of it) vs what makes a marine engine vs a car engine.

    In my experience there are two types of people that ask questions about marine engines. The first are those who have or can get a cheap one from somewhere, and want to know what special bits need to be added. In this case I usually recommend against DIY simply because by the time you add the oil cooler, different pumps, change the fuel lines, distributor, carb, ect. You have spent as much in new parts for a used engine as a good used marine rebuild costs anyway, but with a lot more work and aggravation. This to me is why it is normally not work marinizing an engine yourself.

    On the other hand are people who own a marine engine, and need parts for it. In this case often is is cheaper to buy replacement parts from other than a marine distributor, assuming they really are the same.

    I think this to me is where a lot of the problems come from, is that we are using two different views of what marinizing means.
     

  15. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    the base engine is 110 horsepower natural and 135 turbo. yanmar sell them at up to 315 horse power. i have been told they are beefed up internally to handle the extra power. if you call 150 to 180 hp more than standard , i guess you are right.
     
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