30' plywood sharpie

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by davesg, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    I think there a lot of the same ideas that Bolger had.
    Fair amount of rocker , little flair , high free board for reserve stability,
    and decent ballast . Very cool . It shows that there are many ways to go with the form , but if you change one part , all the others have to be changed also .
     
  2. boat fan
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    boat fan Senior Member

  3. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    i think the important thing about the as 29/39 shape is to keep the sides and keel the same shape and of course weight and balance, but it seems scalable to me
     
  4. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    Good luck on getting much info on the design from Chris Morjohn .
    But I think there is enough info out there to get the idea .
     
  5. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    I dont know how this worked out for the AS39 , as it is basically the the 29
    stretched out . Both having a beam of 7'10" to accommodate plywood construction . The AS39 would make an excellent live a board coastal cruiser .
    you could get a large central pilot house out of it and reduce the the freeboard fore and aft . you would lose full standing head room and the aft cabin , but if it were just for me I would not care .
     
  6. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    the 39 appears to be a stretched 29 with the same beam
    what appeals to me beside the max use of room in the dimensions is that something like that could be legally trailered
     
  7. souljour2000
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    souljour2000 Senior Member

    I am very interested in how Chris Morejohn did his portholes on "Hogfish maximus". His smaller "hogfish" and he and family used to be across from us in Titusville Marina in the late 90's. It seems like a design technique that is not uncommon but I'm not quite sure if this is so. It look like it may be very thick darkened plexi or that other stuff..can't think of what it's trade name is...and that they are thru-bolted flush with some inset for the bolt heads to sit in on the outside of the porthole but be covered over somehow to appear flush and basically the same color as the tinted perspex or plexi...perspex..was that the name? Anyone who can enlighten me here...I'd appreciate it as I want to use this system on my Hunter 20 upgrade if I can...it appears simple and strong ...but I could be wrong...not to make a rhyme, but it seemed like the time..etc etc..:)
     
  8. boat fan
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    boat fan Senior Member

    Are you thinking of Lexan , soulgour ?

    It`s strong but soft ...( scratches ).
     
  9. souljour2000
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    souljour2000 Senior Member

    lexan...It could be...scratches easily?...scratching potential is a major downside to that type of installation..especially on my boat where there is not much room on either catwalk forward...hmm...scratch that idea...:rolleyes:
     
  10. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    sandwhich the lexan between plexiglass
     
  11. kayaker50
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    kayaker50 Junior Member

    Troy2000, have you done anything more with the model? I've spent the last couple of weeks looking over all the links posted here as well as googleing and binging wooden sharpie etc.
    I'm particularly interrested in your cabin- how much headroom can you get while keeping the good looks of a traditional sharpie. Here is a photo of one I really like made from Woodenboat's Egret plans (modified) in North Carolina with a slightly higher cabin: http://www.woodenboat.com/wbmag/lau...chings&PHPWS_Entry_op=view&PHPWS_Entry_id=224
    Chip.
     
  12. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I haven't had much time to mess with it, k50. Between working my regular shifts, covering for guys on vacation, driving home and back on my days off, handling the honey-doo lists at two separate houses (our own and the one we just inherited from my mother-in-law) and everything else that comes up, I'm getting a little frustrated. It's something you can't really just sit down and knock out a few minutes at a time, unless you're following someone else's detailed plans.

    But I've messed with it enough to prove (to my own satisfaction, at least) that you can get a decent sheer and a proper bottom with straight-cut sides, by manipulating the beam and the flare. What I have now is basically just the sides wrapped around four temporary molds, brought together at the stem and ending in a transom at the other end. The molds at each end are set where I plan to have actual bulkheads to create water storage and flotation compartments, and the other two are set at each end of the future centerboard trunk.

    By tweaking those four molds, I've come up with the recommended flat run in the bottom, for the first third of the waterline length. There's a gentle rocker in the middle third. The final third is almost straight, but not quite; it has a little bit of rocker in it. I'll settle for that....considering that we're looking at a maximum 8 or 9 inches of draft anyway, I doubt it'll slow the boat much.

    Now I need to start laying out the actual bulkheads and frame members. It looks like I'm going to be stuck away from home but not working the next couple of days, so hopefully I can make some progress. I may cheat and leave the chine stringers out, to simplify and speed up construction.
     
  13. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Oh....the headroom question. I'm going for decent sitting headroom in the cabin, and that's it. I'm not even going to try to push the envelope; it'll probably be something like four and a half feet.

    Remember, I'm building this for the Colorado River lakes, which are surrounded by desert. I'm not really figuring on needing much in the way of being able to hide from the elements. I can't run a big enough air conditioner to fight the summer anyway, and the winters aren't so hard I need to hole up inside. Most of our waking time will be spent in the cockpit, or on the beach we've grounded the boat on.
     
  14. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    hows these Sharpies do as coasters
    I'd think they would slam like crazy and knock the stuffing out of the crew in anything other than glass water

    my old sailfish was basically a sharpy and its small size lent a lot to its comfort at least for me as a kid

    but at say 30'
    whole other story I would think
    one good storm and I would think you would blow the bottom right out of it coming off the first big wave

    my guess is your limited to clear skies and smooth sailing or am I missing something. I've never sailed a larger sharpie.

    B
     

  15. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Yes, you're missing something. If that were true, the use of sharpies wouldn't have spread from Connecticut to Florida. Sharpies are actually very seaworthy boats within their limits, and I've never heard of one 'getting the bottom blown right out of it coming off the first big wave'--particularly since that's the strongest part of the average sharpie....:)

    To begin with, a sharpie is just that: long and narrow. It isn't going to act like a skimming dish or a scow, when it gets into rough water.

    There is a case on record in which a tonging sharpie rescued the crew of a coasting schooner at Branford, Connecticut, during a severe gale, after other boats had proved unable to approach the wreck.

    And your sailfish was nothing like a sharpie. You can't really compare a sailboard that you're sitting on top of to a 30' sailboat with several thousand pounds of displacement....
     
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