2nd verse should I do the same as the first

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by jrwds63, Jul 21, 2020.

  1. jrwds63
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    Location: split tween KW FL and AC NJ

    jrwds63 New Member

    Hello all I have been reading these forums and am here to gather some advice for my latest project..approx 20 years ago during a lull in employment I had a 1980 vintage sea nymph fm 161 which had wood floors everywhere... and over time they had gone soft, so I removed them used a cdx grade plywood 1/2 and re-floored that boat using Thompson water seal on the sides and faces of the cut new boards and then wrapped new carpet around each piece and both gluing and stapling the carpet to the bottom of the board with a arrow t-50 stapler....after finishing that boat I went back to work and did not really get a chance to use the boat often and thus sold it....so I did not have a chance to see how that renovation held up over time...fast forward some 20 years and I once again find myself in a similar situation I have a 1993 Sea Nymph fm 161 ..the factory sometime in the 1990s went to a predominately aluminum floor except for the area in the front bow platform for whatever reason they left the flooring in this area out of plywood..well as you may have guessed that plywood has long since seen better days and it is due to be replaced...my question I guess is this.. what if anything? everything ? should I do different nowadays ? the marine carpeting in the whole boat needs to be replaced should I re-carpet? use vinyl? should I use pvc lumber? cdx/ mdo/marine ply... if plywood is used of whatever form what should I apply to the ply to maximize its service life thompson or a similar waterseal ? epoxies? or the boiled linseed, mineral spirits and spar poly treatment I saw referenced in these threads? Also I am wondering does anyone have any experience with applying a roll on bed liner into one of these boats after the decking is redone.. is there any special treatments needed to make it stick to the alum inside the hull? I guess what I am doing is asking if things have changed enough that I should try something or another that I have not even thought of...this is not a high dollar boat it is intended to trailer and fish crab and clamming around the house...Thanks for advance for all your help and ideas
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You can get ground contact plywood at Homedepot for about $32. Exterior carpet lasts quite a while. The problem is that it ends up stinking if you fish and get all that crud on it. Bed liner works well on aluminum and fair on plywood.
    1/2 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. Ground Contact Southern Yellow Pine Pressure-Treated Plywood-PLY12MGYCDX - The Home Depot https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-2-in-x-4-ft-x-8-ft-Ground-Contact-Southern-Yellow-Pine-Pressure-Treated-Plywood-PLY12MGYCDX/207005716?MERCH=REC-_-pipsem-_-206971071-_-207005716-_-N
     
  3. jrwds63
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    Location: split tween KW FL and AC NJ

    jrwds63 New Member

    years ago they used to say to not use pressure treated wood near or in contact with aluminum had to do with the alum rusting /rotting has that changed since they now treat it differently then they used to?
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What would the problem be, copper in the treated wood ?
     
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  5. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Why not make it all aluminum flooring?
    Wood is probably your easiest and cheapest option. Even a cheap CDX, coated in epoxy would last long enough for your use, and if it didn't, is just as easy to replace again. Just, if you wanted the staying power of the rest of the flooring, go for the whole set and match the foredeck to the rest of it.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     
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  6. jrwds63
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    Location: split tween KW FL and AC NJ

    jrwds63 New Member

    Yes the problem used to be that the copper used in the treatment process of the wood (Alkaline Copper Quaternary ACQ) or Copper Azole CA, which replaced the Chromated Copper Arsenate CCA wood preservative, had such a high concentration of copper, that it was thought to corrode right through the aluminum sheets that made up the hull. I am guessing that perhaps since no one seems familiar with same that this not been borne out though experience?
     
  7. jrwds63
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    Location: split tween KW FL and AC NJ

    jrwds63 New Member

    That was my original thought I even priced out some aluminum sheet goods to do the project with...BUT then it dawned on me that this fore deck area has 2 storage areas and a live well in it and that these areas had manufacture provided aluminum access panels and that these panels are set to be flush when surrounded by a 1/2 thick wood floor....thus if I were to say use 1/8 thick aluminum sheeting to replace the floor the 3 access panels will be 3/8 of an inch higher then the surrounding floor thus, likely leading to tripping hazards and other issues, trying to reduce the thickness of these aluminum hatches by 3/8 did not seem feasible nor did trying to add 3/8 inch spacers across the whole area without having movement of the aluminum panel flexing as you walked between them seemed just as unfeasible ...thus my thoughts returned to using plywood as the manufacture had done...but if someone has an idea to take up the space or trim the panels readily I am open to suggestions?
     
  8. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

  9. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It would be easy to add a strip of rubber in between, or simply paint it
     
  10. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Roseburg marine ply 1/2" is a suitable option, but I recommend sealing the edges with epoxy or even a glass wrap. I have experience with it performing poorly on the edges when exposed. I would recommend an epoxy primer or an enamel paint on top and either traction paint or carpeting depending upon use..

    The plywood sucks moisture on exposed edges. Even edges under paint seem to pull in moisture and blow up. Epoxy is the best way to deal with it.
     
  11. cthippo
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    cthippo Senior Member

    Take a look at the YouTube Channel Tiny Boat nation. He converts small generic boats into bass boats using cheap aluminum shapes and a lot of the techniques may transfer for what you are doing.
     
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  12. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    Pt plywood will corrode the aluminum.

    You can go two ways, really cheap, which will Last 5-10 years, or a little more cost and effort and it will last forever.

    The cheap route. Cut a piece of exterior grade plywood to shape, paint it with porch paint, drop it in place and call it good. When it finally gets bad enough it takes about an hour to build a new one and put it in place.

    The forever version. Use aluminum diamond plate, cut to shape and support as needed.

    It works both ways.

    And if it's a fishing boat, the fish don't care.

    The problem with sealing plywood, and especially if you put carpet over it, is that if one spot is not sealed well enough, or you put a staple or screw in it, you might as well have not made any effort to seal it.
     
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