28' riverboat Cindy Lou

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by troy2000, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I see...now I know...

    Thanks
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Good to see your post Daniel. That looks quite comfortable in your cabin, good thinking as well (no surprise there).
     
  3. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    OK, I picked up the stove Saturday. And it's definitely overkill for the boat. On the other hand, it's going to look just fine set up in the shop while I build the boat...

    Interesting piece. It has double-walled heat shields below and behind. It also has an airtight, cast-iron Heatilator-type set-up. You can hook a small blower up to the rear of the stove, and blow hot air out the two small brass grills in the upper front corners of the stove. The large brass screen covers a piece of either glass or isinglass (mica), that's protected on the inside by another screen, so you can watch the flames.

    I was in a hurry to get the stove in out of the rain, and didn't really have time to look it over before it got stuffed temporarily into a tight corner. When I have a chance, I'll take some detailed pictures.
     
  4. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Unfortunate that you cant use the smoke stack heat on a wood stove.
     
  5. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    You can use some of it, if you have single-wall pipe and install a damper on the pipe as well as on the stove...

    There are also 'chimney ovens,' which may not be practical for boats.

    http://www.cylinderstoves.com/chimney-oven-p-74.html
     
  6. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Ive been told uninsulated pipe is too dangerous.

    Unburnt residue collects and builds up on the inside of a unisulated smoke stack when the uninsulated pipe cools the exhaust. Chimney fire,

    Perhaps there are clever ways to extract the heat from a stack
     
  7. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    When I was growing up I never saw double-wall pipe, much less insulated pipe. Everyone we knew used single-wall. We swept them out now and then, and never had a chimney fire from our stoves. I saw a couple of spectacular ones as an adult though, when I was living in the mountains. Both them involved open fireplaces. One couple was burning a Christmas tree, and another was crumpling up newspaper and throwing it in the fire to get rid of it.

    The double-walled pipe is definitely safer. But I see nothing wrong with a section of single-walled pipe directly connected to the stove; it should stay reasonable warm and keep creosote and soot from building up. The crud in our pipes mostly built up in the sections that were outside and exposed to the weather, rather than inside the house.
     
  8. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Give it a go.

    As long as you are aware of possible danger, you will be able to keep a heads up for potential problems.

    The problem comes when I install a system for a customer. NO WAY. Im not interested in law suites.

    A coil of water circulation tubing around the stack sounds like a good way to harvest hot water. In cold climates, firing up the wood stove, warming the cabin and a hot shower are what makes life beautiful.
     
  9. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Never had a wood stove heat up shower water for me, although it sounds like a good idea. But I've brought my share of water to the boiling point on top of the stove, heated up a bathtub of water with it, and soaked the snow and ice away....

    Of course, when you do that you have to stick another tea kettle of water on the stove before you dive into the tub, so that your loved one can reheat the tub for you as it cools (assuming she's waiting her turn, instead of just hopping in with you). If you're unfortunate enough to be alone, or can't coax her into doing it, you can hop out long enough to do it yourself and leave wet tracks on the floor.

    note: for those of you who are banging your heads on your keyboards because you thought this was going to be a build thread, don't despair. It'll get there eventually...honest.:D
     
  10. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Troy, do you have a link to the composting head you bought? Thank, Stan
     
  11. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Well..a build includes vast amounts of gear. If you don't get the gear and systems sorted before the final build plans are drawn, you will have trouble.

    Every piece of gear you fail to spec before construction will end up as a clumsy add on installation.

    Heating on a boat is a legitimate system that may need to be designed into the boat


    For instance why have fire brick insulation when a stainless steel water tank surrounding the fireplace will serve the same function and keep water hot
     
  12. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Here you go, Stan...
    http://www.c-head.com/C-Head.html

    Mine is scheduled to arrive at my workplace sometime Wednesday, the day after tomorrow. I come in and work 12 hours that evening, get off Thursday morning, and don't go back to work until Saturday morning. So if the toilet gets here on time, I'll install it in my motor home Friday. And I'll take lots of pictures.
     
  13. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Of course, you'd have to design something into the system to keep that water from overheating and boiling away. I'm not up on the possible solutions, but I'll bet most of the heavy lifting has already been done by the designers of solar water-heating systems.
     
  14. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    So, what kind of glue will you use on the frames etc?
     

  15. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I'll be using epoxy to encapsulate each piece before final assembly, so I'll use epoxy for the glue also.
     
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