28' riverboat Cindy Lou

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by troy2000, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    I know these types are not heavy by “whole” house measurements, as a standard. But you’re on a small boat. Thus the key to this is the stability, in terms of the trim/list (especially if not on the centreline) and the statical stability.

    If you don’t have one already, you’re best to get a set of hydrostatics of the hull from lightship to full load (or anticipated max DWL). Then you can see if the heavy weight will influence what else you can have onboard and how high up will be safe. Since whist the burner may not be heavy per se, yet, in terms of the boat and what it displaces and with a shallow draft and narrow-ish beam, its weight can be 'considerable' especially if too high, and the last thing you want is a wave to pass you and the boat flops over to an angle of lol, or worse, over, owing to poor intact stability.
     
  2. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Not being a professional, I'd probably get lost in a set of hydrostatics.

    There's no question about how high the stove would set; the cabin deck is very close to the load waterline.

    I doubt the stove weighs even a hundred pounds. Remember, it's only 28" wide and 15" deep. But of course I may be completely wrong. I'll find out when I load it into my pickup.... and yes, even if I'm right that's a weight that needs to be taken into account.

    But I'm not planning to do anything stupid. If I have doubts or questions I'll get hold of Paul, who designed the boat to begin with.
     
  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Light ship displacement is listed John, she can handle quite a bit more and her PPI is significant at nearly 800 pounds on the first inch, the next inch is about 5% more, so . . . I'll bet that stove is less than 300 pounds, which isn't enough to get too worried about. 100 pounds just doesn't sound right for all that iron. Maybe so, I haven't fooled with a wood burning stove in a few decades (thank God). I did an inspection in North Carolina last week and it was cold. I'd forgotten what walking on ice was all about and again swore I'd never go into the cold again. I just can't do it any more. I never did like it, except as a kid hopping cars or sledding, but then I wised up, moved to a place where snow is where it belongs, on post cards and in photo albums. It should be retired to the place they store the rotary phones of the world.
     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Perfect...no worries then :)

    Agreed, 50kg's sounds light for that...even though dim's aren't given...i suspect all up your figure wont be far off it.

    As the NY is fast approaching here 6:30hrs to go...may I wish you all a very happy new year.

    PS..i hate the cold too....was snowing earlier here today....give me the tropics anyday.
     
  5. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Nice to be warm on a boat.

    Ive only used diesel heaters.

    With all heaters its the chimney that is the complication.
     
  6. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I may be underestimating the weight; it might be up to double the 100 lbs I guesstimated. But I don't think the stove is as massive as it looks in the pictures.
    We'll find out Saturday morning, when I load it into my pickup. I'll definitely take a dolly with me....

    A Happy New year to you, too. And stay warm; some of my memories of Japan are downright cold ones. My son is in Korea, and he's freezing his buns off. It's no place for a kid from Southern California.

    Happy New Year to everyone else on the forum, too. Especially Paul, who drew me a boat I like better every time I look at the plans.
     
  7. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Be sure to leave some space on the foredeck for a decent size pile of firewood....




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  8. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    The main thing about the stove is it's just too big, probably the next is it isn't built 'good' enough, as in air leaks enough to make combustion regulation iffy and boat movement eventually breaking cast iron legs off, etc. Making a small one of pipe or plate would be easy, a perfect air inlet is a carburetor. I made a home furnace with a carburetor inlet, you could shut it down to where eventually the fire would go out.

    What's the construction of the boat, wood, glass??
     
  9. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I have enough on my plate already, without making my own stove.:)

    If this stove turns out to be unsuitable for the boat, I'll probably replace the Jotul in our living room with it, install the Jotul in the shop after it's enclosed, then go back to plan A and buy a Sardine stove for the boat. Then again, I might just stick the new stove in the shop, and leave the Jotul where it is.....

    The boat will be plywood-on-frame construction. Everything will be liberally encapsulated in epoxy, of course.
     

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  10. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    Good choice, Troy, don't worry about the stove, it will make you happy. I installed one nearly similar in our combined workboat-picnic express on demand from my wife. She's got kind of a firing-gene, probably from her lapland ancestors; wherever she goes there must be a possibility to light a fire (physical one....).

    We use that boat (aluminium catamaran, 30´) as long as we can get through the ice, and believe me, there is a good feeling coming indoors when its cold outside, stove slowly purring, a coffee pot on top and a new bread coming up in the oven.

    I´ll bring a photo or two as soon as I have sobered up after the celebrations tonight..... A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU ALL BOAT NERDS!
     
  11. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Don't those Sardines cost a thousand bucks? Check out Fatso Stoves on line. 10" diameter and about 10" hi.
    http://www.fatscostoves.com/ Even these small ones can run you out of the boat. On my build I'm planning on a 3 burner cook top, burning propane. I'm going to get a quality 8" clay pot with a hole in the bottom and put it over the smallest burner on low. Will find a way to keep it from falling. Did that in a camper for years. My boat cabin is 13' x 8' x 7' high with additional queen bed area under front deck. It will easily heat this area in cold weather.






    ' high
     
  12. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I'd rather not look at something like that day in and day out... practical though they may be. And I'm not wild about that sheet metal back, either.
     

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  13. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    The next size up...
     

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  14. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Well, it was just a thought Troy--to save money. My clay pot is what I will use. Got all 8 frames built, epoxed, bolted and stained. Just heve to coat them 3 times with epoxy then time for the outside tent to go up. 23* here this am.
     

  15. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Ouch. And I was feeling sorry for myself because it's so cold here my windshield was lightly iced-up this morning....

    I'll admit the price of the Sardine stoves might wind up ruling one out, or at least move it down on my list of priorities. The list price for a plain cast stove is $1090. A glass front is another $150.00, and you have to call for a quote if you want a porcelain finish.
     
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