26' steel scow cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Aneblanc, Nov 16, 2013.

  1. Aneblanc
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    Aneblanc Junior Member

    Anyone aware of a 26' steel scow (barge, pram) cruiser for blue water sailing. Beam 8', single long keel, outside ballast, 2.5' draft, centerboard, pilothouse.

    Thanks
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This sounds like a stretch of the concept - a small steel scow hull. Yep, it could be done, though I don't know of any nor any plans available. Lastly, I surely wouldn't want to go into blue water with a shoe box hull. Near shore, maybe, in nice weather, but not deep water.
     
  3. Aneblanc
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    Aneblanc Junior Member

  4. Aneblanc
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    Aneblanc Junior Member

    I should add low aspect ratio rig, battened balanced lug aka junk. But that is secondary to finding the right hull.
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The Revolution 22 is a far cry from a steel blue water scow. A steel scow hull would very well be a "low tech" version and not something easily performed.

    You should look into blue water steel hull offerings first, which in this size range will be very limited, mostly because of weight.

    Obviously, you'll need a custom design or at least a semi custom, considering your peculiar requirements.
     
  6. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

  7. Aneblanc
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    Aneblanc Junior Member

    Very limited indeed though it shouldn't be heavier to build in 3mm steel than it is in classic wood.

    That's what I want to avoid and that why I am here to ask if there is any stock plan of a scow or of any 26' that you would be aware of and that could be built in steel. Maybe an existing design in wood could be adapted to steel.

    I am interested in a scow for the ease of building, the volume, the comfort of the foredeck, the balance of the hull upwind and the buoyancy of the bow downwind. I am thinking of some of the Chinese junks.

    The weight can be mitigated with a beamless laminated plywood raised deck with a strong camber bolted on a margin plate (flange) like on the original Wylo II and many of its copies.
     
  8. Aneblanc
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    Aneblanc Junior Member

    I forgot to mention that my intention is to not have an engine or at least trail a propeller under the boat all the time.

    Under external ballast I meant a ballasted keel... In steel it's just a box full of ballast or tanks.

    Harry 2 is too big, the original Harry is not an offshore sailboat. But I looked at those designs and also at Reuel Parker's Scow 33.
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You're making some assumptions that aren't appropriate. A wooden build will be lighter than steel, if a modern build method, considerably lighter than steel, if a 26' barge like hull.

    The barge hull form isn't the very last shape I'd want to take into blue water, which begs the question of your deep water sailing experience?

    External ballast is always a good thing IMO, though in a 2' 6" draft vessel with the initial stability of a barge like hull, absolutely useless. By the time you've heeled enough to make the ballast effective, you'd have other, much more pressing issues. Certainly any ballast could be external, though you will not get any improved stability from it on a barge.

    Propulsion other than sail will be all but mandatory in a barge like hull. This is the reason they put a pointy end on sailboats - to dramatically improve efficiency. Yes, there are some exceptions, such as the aluminum contrivance previously listed, but that really is a canoe body sailing hull form, with a truncated bow for some styling exercise.

    Maybe it would be better just to develop your SOR, so we know what you really need, rather then hunt and peck at different, widely divergent hull types and misconceptions about them. It's still unlikely you'll find a stock plans that rings many of your bells, maybe a modified stock plan can do.
     
  10. bpw
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    bpw Senior Member

    Trying to sail a boat like this without an engine will be an absolute nightmare. No hope of going upwind in any sort of breeze.

    Too narrow for form stability, too shallow to get stability from ballast, lots of weight up high with the pilot house and very heavy. No way you will be able to carry enough sail to push upwind against waves.
     
  11. Aneblanc
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    Aneblanc Junior Member

    Thanks for your opinion. I hope that a few more people will react. Maybe this is the wrong forum. I really don't know much about barges or scows. I am trying to get more information.

    I might have 25000 miles of deep water experience always short handed (7 Atlantic crossings). I am looking to replace my Wylo 35' for a similar boat but smaller for my olden days. I am hoping to pass it to my daughter in a few years.

    My previous boat, an Eric, was about as heavy as my current boat for about the same length, about 10 tons loaded. It was strip planked on frames. I didn't built it though I repaired it extensively. I don't really want anything else than steel for cruising, certainly not anything in wood, maybe aluminium.

    I am hoping for a 4t loaded displacement for a 26' boat.
     
  12. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

  13. Stumble
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    Stumble Senior Member

    Perhaps this is a translation issue.
     
  14. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Well you have the experience, but why a barge?

    There are a limited number of steel designs available, but in this size, it's just not as practical as other materials, which is why there are few stock plan choices.

    Have a look at the 27' Bruce Roberts Spray, in steel.
     

  15. peterAustralia
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    peterAustralia Senior Member

    i cant help you with a 26ft design
    You may have to branch out and do your own thing

    Chapelle has a 22ft scow, it could be scaled up. What do you do,, multiply everything by 26/22? Lines are in his book (I have a copy,,, exact name of book escapes me now,,, but it is a good book)

    some photos are here (the one with the lee-boards)
    http://www.tacking-outrigger.com/motorcruiser.html
     
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