1/18 “42ft LONGBOAT ARMED FOR WAR 1834” model

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by yuen_sail, Jan 20, 2011.

  1. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member


    how do you find out what battle damage would have looked like?
     
  2. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    I just do what they tell me, like most workers. A large drawing of the damaged model arrives from on high and I figure out how to make the model look like the picture. I did do some research on-line and found great video of cannons shooting holes in things.
    Mostly on the 1/6 model I used a hole saw and pliers, then carefully building up "framing" bits sticking out.
    On the 1/3 scale deck, that last photo was after the effects boys triggered several dozen "gravel guns" and a lot of primacord. BANG! Here's what a gravel gun looks like, stay back the f*****s are dangerous as the back blows off sometimes. And last, here's one of the best model painters in the world at work just before everything gets destroyed. Notice the pistol on the keg.
     

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  3. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member

    HMS Bounty?
     
  4. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    In P2 the "Edinburgh Trader" was HMS BOUNTY, but this is the movie ship "Endeavour", a supposed East India trader, and this model was based on HMS VICTORY.
    We built 3 of them, a 1:12 filming model to museum quality, a 1:6 pyro model to blow up, and a 1:3 deck section to show cannon balls coming up through the deck.
    Live action had a floating set of part of the ship and interior sets were built on stage, so it takes many fake things to fool you into seeing a ship which has never existed and really believing it's there.
     
  5. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member

    2011.1.22 Ribs samples and stern
     

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  6. MastMonkey
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    MastMonkey Junior Member

    Could one learn a bit about building a full size boat, talking the traditional ways, by building models like this. Is the framing and everything accurate?
     
  7. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    This museum craftsman is making his models exactly like the full size vessel. Try it yourself with a simple design.
    Use balsa and don't try to make the first one "presentable" and you'll learn a great deal.
     
  8. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Yuen, how is your model coming along? We all want to see it. Will it have a bow carronade or some other gun? Will you rig it? On our movie models we used silk for the sails on the smaller scale (1:12) ones, and it looked right.
    I don't know how this would endure in a museum model but it rippled beautifully when teased with a hair dryer on camera.
    Possibly this boat would have a dipping lug rig?
     
  9. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member



    Embarrassed! Because it's almost seen China years! Work schedule some slow down! Below is the ship's drawings!




    Embarrassed! Without understanding "Possibly this boat would have a dipping lug rig?" mean!
     

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  10. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Yuen,
    This is the dipping lug as used historically.
    Here are two photos showing the 18th century Navy small boat rig on one of our local educational long boats, a copy of Bligh's launch. You see how the sail is now on one side of the mast, then to tack one must lower it and hoist on the other side. In the first photo the boat is on port tack, next photo on starboard tack. Mizzen sail is not set in these photos. Masts were movable and one could put the larger main mast in the forward mast partner.
    In later years and civilian use this Naval rig did away with the main mast and only used a large foresail and small mizzen, becoming a common English fish boat rig called "Fore and mizzen punt". It was very good at that because the entire middle of the boat was then open to handle nets.
    I believe the rig in the photos is the proper rig for your model.
     

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  11. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member

    I am back!
     

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  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Old Woodbutcher

    Nice work! Glad we didn't lose you!
     
  13. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Fantastic !!
     
  14. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Very impressive and accurate work. Thank you for coming back!!
     

  15. yuen_sail
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    yuen_sail Junior Member

    Continue……
     

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