Zeeschouw Plans

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by flathead65, Nov 8, 2014.

  1. flathead65
    Joined: Apr 2014
    Posts: 45
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: B.C. Canada

    flathead65 Junior Member

  2. tdem
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 130
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 41
    Location: NZ

    tdem Senior Member

    There is a linesplan as well here (I'm sure you have seen it):
    http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl/...eiljachten&sc=subject all "kajuitzeiljachten"

    I just looked in my copy of "Ronde en Platbodem yachten" which is pretty much the reference work on the subject. In the back it has the same drawings as the one you've linked to, there is about a page of writing on the history as well.

    Finally, you can get a plasma cut steel kit from here:
    http://www.blomaak.nl/Zeeschouw_bouwpakket

    The smallest is 9.5 by 3.7 m.
     
  3. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 980
    Likes: 14, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 185
    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    I have wondered about the forward fullness in these designs. They have a look of a cods head and mackerel tail about them. They obviously have a long evolutionary trail, so they must work. But how well do they sail, and what are their characteristics?
    [​IMG]
     
  4. flathead65
    Joined: Apr 2014
    Posts: 45
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: B.C. Canada

    flathead65 Junior Member

    http://www.westerdijkzeeschouwen.nl/zeilindelingsplan.html#
    http://www.visserman-zeeschouw.nl/foto/showimg.php?file=/Foto album 1/P1010087 (Medium).jpg
    Thanks for your replies. Here are a couple of links I found. They seem to be built of frameless construction using a central bulkhead, the interior furnishings adding stiffness. I think they are very practical little yachts suitable for coastal cruising. The full forward section makes a stable platform for them to go dry on the tide and facilitates a very roomy interior for their size. the propeller is well protected by the skeg and steel construction speaks for itself. I also think they are very salty looking compared to whats available in small steel auxiliary designs which mostly resemble Macgregors imho.The Dutch seem to excel in building small steel boats. I am though still looking for a 7.5-8 meter design such as the picture of the one on the trailer.
    http://www.marktplaats.nl/a/watersp...s/m782225112-zeeschouw-met-nieuwe-foto-s.html Here is one that is very close to what I'm looking for. For 3500 Euros (you couldn't build for that) I wonder what it would cost to have it shipped to Canada?
     
  5. WindRaf
    Joined: Oct 2014
    Posts: 343
    Likes: 5, Points: 0
    Location: Italy

    WindRaf Senior Member

    They are not inspired by the cod heads, but at the ducks. These boats are very stable even in stormy waters, although not deep keels. The main section very advanced prevents any tendency to surfing and to luff with the sea at back even with a little rudder immersed.
     
  6. flathead65
    Joined: Apr 2014
    Posts: 45
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: B.C. Canada

    flathead65 Junior Member

    This is good information affirming the positive attributes of the type.There must be plans geared to the homebuilder somewhere out there. Still waiting on input from our Dutch members who can help.
     
  7. tdem
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 130
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 41
    Location: NZ

    tdem Senior Member

    Why would there be plans for the home builder? It seems like they are all built by boatyards.

    Selway Fisher has plans for a slightly smaller Hengst, which is a flat bottom, but not a scow. http://www.selway-fisher.com/Yachts2435.htm

    I found a zeeschouw of the size you're after here, but the boatyard that made them has closed. http://www.ssrp.nl/stamboek/schepen/bolster-2

    The boat has its own website as well:
    http://www.zeeschouw-bolster.nl/2011/09/

    De Deining boatyard builds a 10.5m model. It was designed by Seahorse Naval Architects (Martijn van Schaik). I suppose you could contact about a custom design based on their 10.5m model. http://www.seahorse-na.nl/en/projects/03008/index.html

    Here is a nice video of a wooden schouw that was converted to the "fisherman model" (cabin removed). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYVwMQiKFSU

    And here a video of the build of a wooden one:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYVwMQiKFSU

    According to my book the zeeschouw was designed to replace the existing smaller fishing boats that were too expensive to build and maintain, around the 1900's. They were built to handle sea conditions all year round, in any weather.

    Compared to the scows for inland waters, the zeeschouw has a narrower bottom, and more flare up to the first chine. They are also much wider at the chine. This makes them stiff and well mannered in rough seas.

    They are relatively good upwind, and easy on the helm downwind. This is partly due to the shallow keel. This improves windward performance, tracking and reduces rolling.
     
  8. flathead65
    Joined: Apr 2014
    Posts: 45
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: B.C. Canada

    flathead65 Junior Member

    Very helpful. Thank you.
     
  9. susho
    Joined: Dec 2006
    Posts: 88
    Likes: 6, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 78
    Location: the Netherlands

    susho Composite builder

  10. Haddock
    Joined: Dec 2014
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Exmorra (NL)

    Haddock New Member

    Hi,

    I am the owner of the Durgerdammer Zeeschouw (for sale).
    And I have all the drawings (line, construction, sail plan, and so on.
    This boat is 7,35 x 2,9 x 0,5 m.

    simon.schellevis@home.nl
     

  11. gdavis
    Joined: Dec 2014
    Posts: 72
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: belfast,maine

    gdavis Junior Member

    Hi flathead...that is a cool boat! First I've seen of that design. I'm always interested in hard chine or multi chine designs just for the economy and easier build. Looking at the plans it wouldn't be too hard to build a scale model so you get the expanded shape of the panels. I find that a scale of 1.5"=1' or 2"=1' is easy to work with, no tiny bits. With the expanded panel dimensions this lady could be built like the stitch and glue boats. basically bending the panels around a few bulkheads and welding the seams. Well, kinda that easy! Or just(just?) scale off the drawings you have, make say 4 or 5 temp molds set up on a strong back and tweeked till fair. You'll be on your way. Wow, i'm thinking about that boat increased to about to 38' with a 3 masted junk rig. Can you picture it? Add the fact that it is shoal draft and sits pretty on the beach and you've really got something. Hmmm, maybe I need to build a model! Anyhow, hope you build one these sweeties..............................have fun.......................g
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.