Z65 Chris Ostlind plans..

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Frankh78, Nov 5, 2015.

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  1. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Beaconsfield Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    C'mon Corley, you know the history, that guy that built the El Gato had to badger and badger to get his drawings. It was a credit to him that he got to finish the boat at all. Duckworks took Ostlinds page down after about 5yrs or more of "coming soon".
    There are no prices and no ordering facilities on the page.
    I'd love to be wrong, the guy has a great eye for design, when he started putting these renderings up I was amongst the first to offer support and encouragement but nothing ever came of it.
     
  2. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Corley epoxy coated

    I'm just giving Chris the benefit of the doubt, nothing more. He has mentioned to me that his design business is functional again and he is back on track. I see a lot of the vicious commentary that goes on at Sailing Anarchy and don't think it is either fair or balanced. A simple email to him to ask the question as to plan availability for a particular design seems both courteous and reasonable.
     
  3. Frankh78
    Joined: Sep 2015
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    Location: The Netherlands

    Frankh78 Junior Member


    You are right Wayne, I know how small they are and I am not looking for a cruiser but my first build trimaran, for clubracing and with a cabin for some shelter for not more than one night. I'm a bit hesitant to start my first build with a Carbon shaped hull as the TC to be honest and I like the strip (foam) planking method on the scarab. I know the farrier22 is small as well. On the scarab there are settees and berths, however, without (much) headroom for an adult.
    Choices and choices to be made.. So thank you for the support you're giving me
     
  4. waynemarlow
    Joined: Nov 2006
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    waynemarlow Senior Member

    Frank, the strip plank method will take longer than setting up a former and semi moulding the foam. We were able to set up the formers in one day, lay up the foam the following day and carbon and glass the inside of 1 side the following. It was taking about 8 man days to create a hull half. The Farrier style method of build is a very fast method and where it wins significantly is that the surface is very fair and needs no scarfing and joining with tapes.

    The biggest time consuming thing is not the hull outer panels but all the reinforcing webs and ribs, fitting the bulkheads, the internal floors and any detail panels such as settees and berths. Take for example the ring beam we used to take all the loading of the rig and beams, I think that took 4 days to make alone, but without it the cabin would have been unuseable as you would have had the beams intruding across the cabin. All these things are common to both build styles.

    Sorry I've never quite got the concept of flat panels glued together creating a not ideal shape, being taped externally, filled with excess fairing and then people wondering why such ugly boats are created. If you want a good looking boat then you really have to think along Marylin Monroe terms, good looking curves.;)
     
  5. Skip JayR
    Joined: Sep 2015
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    Skip JayR Tri Enthusiast

    What is a donorboat, Michael ? In Germany I only know Döner bread :)
     
  6. luckystrike
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    luckystrike Power Kraut

    Dönerbread

    Hi Skip

    a old catamaran, in good condition and bought for a reasonable price donors its parts to make it possible that a Trimaran can be built fast and cheap.

    With the right design you can use a lot of the cat. The hulls for amas, the rig, the trampolines, the mainsheet and the rudders.

    If you think of the price of a new custom mainsail the overall savings are singificant.

    Labour is also reduced a few hundret hours. All you have to do is to build the mainhull and mount a pair of beams.

    When finished you have the time and money left to get yourself a Dönerbread


    Husky6.9.jpg Husky 6.9 lines.jpg

    A early Version, the new one is a little longer and more performance orientated
     
  7. pogo
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Germany Northsea

    pogo ingenious dilletante


    Mmh,

    2m double berth in the forepeak + 2m single berth stb in the salon + 2m cockpit = 20 feet.

    http://www.seagull-boatdesign.com/aktuelles/trimaran.html

    http://www.seagull-boatdesign.com/projekte/seagull-20.html

    or 21'

    http://smalltrimarans.com/blog/first-nicky-cruz-explorer-trimaran-being-built/





    pogo
     

  8. waynemarlow
    Joined: Nov 2006
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    waynemarlow Senior Member

    Yup I agree that it is possible, the Pattinson boat which was on another thread was even more extreme with almost the entire boat covered creating living space, but it is horses for courses and any design has its headlights pointed in a particular direction.

    Would I want the very high freeboard and cabin, no, would I want the very limited day sailing space for friends and family totally at the back of the boat, would I want to feel high up on the water or more skiff like and down on the water, there's so many design dilemmas and every owner is going to want something different.

    At 20ft there's whole bunch of design conundrums and no particular boat is going to get all those values right. In my view the Farrier 22 comes pretty close, going a little bigger the F85SR really tickles my fancy but those extra few feet really starts to cane the bank balance, I think the Pulse is about $50k the F22 closer to $80k the F85 about $ 150k so a few feet starts to really hurt.

    Still one thing for sure is that there's now a real wide variety of 20 footers all appearing in the market, I can' t wait to see Richard Woods curvy number which he alludes to at times and I think I know of 1 or 2 others on designers design boards. Should be good times if we can get the T20 class going.
     
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