Yvan Bougnon's circumnavigation in a beach cat project

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Corley, Jul 23, 2013.

  1. W17 designer
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    W17 designer Senior Member

    Adventuring

    Yes, as you know, I agree with your last paragraph David. GO Yvan GO!
    (By the way, if you're a master of XHTML, please email me. I need some help!).
     
  2. Blackburn
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    Blackburn Senior Member

    ...

    LINK

    :rolleyes:
     
  3. W17 designer
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    W17 designer Senior Member

    Sea lions

    Oh geez! ... I thought everyone talked to sea lions! Ah well, someone is having fun with this. Yvan might not have 'his feet on the ground' but he's very smooth on the water. But perhaps 'that passenger' needs evaluation though ;-)
     
  4. Blackburn
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    Blackburn Senior Member

    ...

    On the seventh day after sailing from Galapagos, Yvan Bourgnon's tracker shows he's now done 973nm. If you switch on the wind info, he's now gotten into steady winds allowing him to beam reach all the way to the Marquesas.

    On his facebook page - after several days of complaining about incessant heavy rain, being soaking wet and not having enough wind - Bourgnon has these latest entries:

    There we have that expression 'glisse' again. Here it is something like 'See how the boat is flowing along!'


    Yvan Bourgnon's YouTube: Two videos this week from his stop in the Galapagos.


    And in a facebook entry March 9th, there was this: "A big thank you to Yvan's supporters who share these postings and translate them into English, Spanish, Italian, and even Russian! That's great!

    Why... You're welcome!

    ;)
     
  5. Blackburn
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    Blackburn Senior Member

    ...

    This item posted on his facebook yesterday:

     
  6. W17 designer
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    W17 designer Senior Member

    foils

    Oh dear! Have to say, I'm a little surprised, especially after the first experience in the Atlantic, that Yvan did not arrange to pack a spare rudder and dagger board on board ... the rudder would probably fit in one hull and the board could be strapped to the tramp. Foils are certainly very vulnerable parts and with all the garbage floating around, logs, lost containers etc, I'd sure want a spare for a 3000 mile trip. A careful choice of minimal spares is part of any long trip planning as clearly total weight is critical, but for my money, at least a spare rudder and associated parts would be high on the list. Sure hope he can make it to the Marquesas with this handicap.
     
  7. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member


    me too - especially after this comment

    The world is full of "very important personal challenged people" - all after the popular accolades and public approval, or is it the adrenaline rush ?


    If they get lucky and survive, they get the rewards - if they don't, then one more "lunatic" leaves the gene pool.


    Personally, I dislike encouraging people to risk their and other peoples lives for little real achievement.
     
  8. W17 designer
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    W17 designer Senior Member

    challenges

    Personally, I am still glad this world has such people and perhaps in presently unknown ways, we can still benefit and learn something. I understand this challenge has long interested Yvan and he knew he could not wait much longer, or the required physical endurance and strength would no longer be there. As long as there are new challenges, there will be someone who needs to take it on ... and good for them! Sailors certainly have more to learn from this, than say someone deciding to climb a new mountain or jump from some crazy new height. Just a personal viewpoint though.
     
  9. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    RWatson, my man, I'm sure that Yvan Bougnon needed absolutely no encouragement to do what he is doing now; it would have been his idea and his decision. Remember his brother Laurent broke records and established new sailing approaches when he singlehanded his big ORMA 60. I'd say it's in their genes. You (and I) may not have this extreme motivation ... but they do. Admire their tenacity. Leave it at that.
     
  10. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    I cant agree with that sentiment. Stop reading here if you dont want to be bored to death by an old fart who rambles on about lifes problems




    But - I think .....

    everyone who risks their life is motivated by something - and it usually boils down to internal social needs, or some external motivation like money.

    With the advent of the internet, the pressure on young people to be recognized, to be 'different' and 'special' has never been greater.

    From Base Jumping to solo-sailing, the number of young people risking their lives, the lives of rescuers, their health, and the time of hospitals and doctors - has never been greater.

    I have one child who has wiffled his 28 years away on high adrenalin activities, acquiring no productivity skills, who will be a burden to himself and society in future years.

    It gives me no joy seeing that, and all the other youngsters, get addicted to risky pursuits that really don't produce any real rewards.

    Sure - you see a lot of YouTube videos and Websites showing amazing feats of endurance and skill.

    Now, try searching for memorials of young dead adventurers, or those crippled and maimed by misadventure, or distraught parents who lose children to ill advised activities.

    Not too many of those - are there !


    End of sermon.
     
  11. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

    How depressing to write ones son off at 28.

    Forget to take your happy pills today ?
     
  12. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    probably.


    I remember a true story, of a mum who asked her 85 yo. mother

    "How old do you have to be before you stop worrying about your children"

    The old lady stopped moment, then said "Oh, my dear, you will have to ask someone much older than me ".
     
  13. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Quote:- "It gives me no joy seeing that, and all the other youngsters, get addicted to risky pursuits that really don't produce any real rewards." Quote.
    How do you regard "real rewards".
    Perhaps rewards by your standards.
    But how about the standards of other people. Don't they have the right to set their own standards which meet their own particular requirements and bring their own "real rewards". Don't forget, The Grass is Greener------------etc:.
     
  14. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    Yvan's latest facebook update notes that his autopilot has failed again. I cant think of anything worse on a long voyage than that, hopefully he can lash the tiller and balance the boat reasonably well to get some rest. On the positive side he is now making steady progress as the wind has filled in.
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I still reckon that Japanese fella that skied down Mt Everest about 40 years ago set the standard for mad adventure, and all others since are just not measuring up. :p
     
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