Yrvind

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Manie B, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

  2. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

  3. MoeJoe
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    Looks like he has a good chance of starting to make progress south-west now.

    One thing that has been most interesting to me so far is observing how unstable and fairly harsh the weather systems are in the northern Atlantic, even in July.

    It may be a few years from now, but a lap around the northern Atlantic is definitely on my bucket list.
     
  4. JPE
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    JPE Junior Member

    In one of his videos Yvind was explaining his journey plans, and referred the admiralty map of the atlantic. I was just stunned when he explained that the map shows prevailing winds in that area, and they were good for him. Ahem. In north atlantic there are no prevailing winds. It's a constantly changing mess of high and low pressure systems...

    Made me wonder what kind of a sailor he actually is ;)
     
  5. A II
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Welcome to the forum and to the thread JPE,

    Alas you didn't pay too much attention to the video you commented on, or you didn't understand anything from what was said and shown there, in any case you've posted complete nonsense here about what you think Sven has said in the video.



    Sven posted that video in his preparations and plans post on June 9, 2020.

    And I've posted the video here on the thread in post #594 on June 29, 2020.

    When Sven in the video referred to winds and currents on the admiralty chart he showed, he pointed them out, in an area where prevailing winds do occur, and where he plans going to.

    Below's shown a screenshot from ± 2:11 in the video with automatically generated subtitles switched on, and Svens finger pointing to the area he talks about.

    If you watch the video, and listen, and pay attention, and follow the directions of his hands, then you will see that he actually talks there about the area a bit south west of where his finger is pointing in the below screenshot.

    Sven Yrvind YouTube CF6q3ObA404 2.11.jpg

    Sven is doing well with his experimental ExLex, and hats off for his current position as shown on the below map screenshot with showing the current pressure lines switched on.

    Sven Yrvind ExLex Tracker June 29 2020.jpg

    There's more info in Sven's post on July 27-28, 2020: One month at sea
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2020
  6. JPE
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    JPE Junior Member

    Ah, I do stand somewhat corrected I see. My memory did not serve me correct, however Yrvind did explain that he would have to be be tacking a lot if he would have passed through Skagerrak to North Sea, because the wind would be against him, and setting off from Ålesund would be more favourable.

    Well, not. As we know, North Sea is affected by the very same weather systems as north Atlantic, so in both cases the bets are off when it comes to winds.

    Using Windy.com one can easily track weather across days and see, that in the areas mentioned by Yrvind, the winds blow from which ever direction they please. There is just no telling how it will be.
     
  7. A II
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Again a misconception, Covid-19 measures prevented Sven to set off from Ireland as he had planned, so he then choose Ålesund for departure instead of home to avoid the Skagerrak for too much shipping there and too less free lee space for his needs. From Ålesund he had the option to pass the UK east or west, he choose to take a route west of the UK for reasons explained in the video. As there's far more shipping and oil rigs in the North Sea, and far less free lee space than he wants and needs while tacking in unpredictable bad weather, on his chosen route he has far more options to always go for a lot of lee space as he explains in the linked text and in the posted video.

    The North Atlantic stretches from the Equator to the Arctic, south of the Equator it's the South Atlantic. The Northern North Atlantic where Sven is now is roughly North of the line from South Newfoundland to South Biscay and includes the North Sea, with the same weather systems, which as mentioned above was for Sven not the main reason to avoid the North Sea. His destination for now is to just hang out till food runs out in the Southern North Atlantic, in the region South of the Northern North Atlantic and North of the Equator, where the prevailing winds are which he talked about in the video, and pointed them out on the shown North Atlantic Admiralty Chart.

    ‘‘ Extent of the Atlantic Ocean according to the 2002 IHO (International Hydrographic Organization) definition, excluding Arctic and Antarctic regions. ’’

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2020
  8. JPE
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    JPE Junior Member

    I am fully aware of the reasons Yrvind set off from Ålesund, thank you very much.

    A mistake, again, by me is the unfortunate use of "north Atlantic" [sic], should have used word northern perhaps, to better describe the area of sea I was trying to refer to.

    There's just no navigating around the fact (pun intended) that Yrvind mentiones the need to tack in the North Sea in his video.
     
  9. A II
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    I've extended the below quoted line from my last above post #607 a bit to explain Sven's main problem with tacking in the North Sea, in comparison with his chosen route west of the UK.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2020
  10. JPE
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    JPE Junior Member

    Yes.
     
  11. A II
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    One of the things I love about Sven is that he documents all his successes and failures and puts them all online, and keeps them there both, so everyone can learn for free from all his experiences good and bad. His for now too stern heavy laden boat is badly going to weather at the moment, so eg. the English Channel would be a disaster for him right now, his solution is he avoids any possible narrow and crowded spaces as long as this is not solved.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2020
  12. JPE
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    JPE Junior Member

    Oh absolutely! While I do not agree with his "dogma", he is inventive, and does not hesitate on following his intuition on design choices. His resilience is remarkable.

    The most interesting one on this latest boat is, in my view, the spoon bow. I'm really looking for his comments on that one.

    It was dissappointing to find out that he had made a (huge) mistake with the loading of the boat, but I do understand the reasons behind it.

    Btw, I do hope he does not go forward with the lifting keel design on his next boat. Adds complexity with very little effect on performance... Risky with no reward.
     
  13. A II
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    A shallow fixed long keel on the next design would give the same gain in windward ability as the now planned lifting keel. But with the lifting keel the boat would be able to escape to safety over a shallow bar or reef, where deeper boats get wrecked or simply don't have an escape option there. And at open sea when lying a hull in bad weather the shallow flat bottomed boat with raised keel would be pushed aside by heavy seas, whereas the keel boat would trip over its keel and experience knock downs and rollovers all the time, which is very uncomfortable for the crew and also bad for the rig. Down wind with the keel raised the lift keel boat would be a little faster, because of its less water resistance by less exposed wetted surface. And the shallow boat also has more options to avoid the use of busy and expensive marinas and hide in beautiful little shallow coves, as well as the options of drying out level on the flat bottom while coming as last and going as first. This all comes for the price of a huge added complexity in design and build and use where Sven all likes to experiment with and don't want to give up on the possible gain options.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2020
  14. JPE
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    JPE Junior Member

    This lifting keel heavily contradicts his aim for simplicity.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020

  15. A II
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    If windward ability on the current boat doesn't improve enough when it gets more empty, then on his first stop Sven easily could add an outside keel beam to the hull, glass it over, and continue the journey within a week or so. For ease of keel work the boat is easily to roll over on a sandy or grass soil with the help of a few people.
     
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