Yrvind

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Manie B, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    I sure hope the new boat has at least 8.0 SM of sail for its working rig and can stand up to that. Even then it will be quite underpowered by today's standards. (This would be an S/D of slightly less than 10. Poor old ExLex had an S/D of less than half of this. More typical sailboats have S/D's which are at least 1.5 times this)

    From reading on his website, I see he hopes to go 5,000 nm in 60 days. With a small sail plan, this may not be likely. He's hoping for an average of 84 miles per day, which would require an average speed of approximately 3.5 kts. The problem with small sail plans is the SA has a hard time overcoming frictional resistance in light to moderate breezes. Once the wind picks up, and if it is favorable, and if the boat can stand up to it, the boat may end up going surprisingly fast, maybe even beyond an SL of 1.34. But there is likely to be too many days of light air, when the boat barely moves as if glued to the water.

    A more likely expectation would be an average of maybe 2.5 kts, for honest 60 mile days. And this is with at least 8.0 SM of sail. My Lola 520 design has an S/D of this class, and this is all I would expect out of her.

    It's interesting to note the the single-handed racing boats started getting huge sail plans even before canting ballast keels came on the scene. The idea then was for them to have enough SA to keep them moving at a reasonable speed even in the light stuff.

    But I agree with Sven on his main points. Cruising boats are not racing boats. And an absolute minimum ocean crossing boat is not going to look like your more typical sailing yacht. It will most certainly carry a much greater portion of its total displacement in stores and equipment, and will for this reason and the reason of range-of-stability requirements, have a much shorter rig (In both height and SA.). Such a boat is likely to also to require a minimal sailing draft and maybe even beach abilility. This is to get access to shallower ports and to avoid costly haul outs. My Lola 520 design is expected to be able to stand on her skeg and her twin keels and not even need a cradle, once on the hard.
     
  2. Yes
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Location: Sweden

    Yes Junior Member

  3. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  4. Yes
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Yes Junior Member

    There's a thread on these forums about that

    Didn't know that. Thanks a lot!
     
  5. Yes
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Yes Junior Member

    Yrvind is now 80 years old (April 21st) Congratulations young man.
     
  6. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I'll guess that makes him over halfway through, which could mean many more daring years to go . . :)

    Congratulations Sven, happy building, and happy sailing, and thanks for sharing !
     
  7. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Not Sven's kind of sailing, but just to celebrate the happy atmosphere of his birthday, congrats again Sven !

     
  8. Yes
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Yes Junior Member

    3 MAJ, 2019 – 13.18

    Anders Eriksson was this morning the first Swedish ever to travel solo around the whole earth without stopping.
    "I celebrate with a cup of extra strong coffee", greets the record sailor from the Atlantic to På Kryss readers.

    After 207 days at sea, Anders Eriksson on Friday morning was the first Swedish ever to travel around the world nonstop on his own. Anders started the record attempt at Las Palmas last October and has been offshore since then without adding to any port or filling up the stores with other than rainwater and self-caught fish. On Friday, Anders Eriksson and his ketch Malala crossed the same longitude, longitude, as he passed on October 18 last year. Thus, he has sailed an entire lap around the earth and crossed both the same longitude and the equator twice.


    Google translation. More here:

    Först runt jorden utan stopp – På Kryss https://pakryss.se/forste-svensk-runt-jorden-utan-stopp/
     
  9. MoeJoe
    Joined: Apr 2012
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    Location: Stockholm, Sweden

    MoeJoe Junior Member

    New boat is launched and undergoing initial trials. I've seen some more videos on Facebook than what's available on Yrvind's own site . New boat looks a lot more stable than the previous one. Sven seem happy with it so far.
    Not sure if these links will work for all, but: Magnus Svensson https://www.facebook.com/magnus.svensson.353250/posts/10211473316509040
    Magnus Svensson https://www.facebook.com/magnus.svensson.353250/videos/pcb.10211457356670054/10211457281188167/?type=3&theater
    Håkan Johansson https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=886781435007573&id=100010271740575
     

  10. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Michigan, USA

    sharpii2 Senior Member

    I have watched the few sailing videos on Yrvind's site. The boat seems to move surprisingly well for one with such a small rig. I can think of three reasons for this:
    1.) The small rig comes with short, un-stayed masts, which offer very little drag above the WL.
    2.) The superstructure is well blended with the hull, and there is minimal appendage area below the WL.
    3.) The hull is heavy for its Beam but light for its length. This property gives it the ability to coast between zephyrs and gusts as well as the ability to keep moving through a chop. Still, it is quite fascinating to see how well she moves with an almost vestigial sail plan.

    I have also noticed that this boat has a system of boom gallows which should make the sail reefing operation much easier. He is also spending a great deal of time doing sea trials. No doubt he will know this boat quite well before he departs on his voyage, which is far less ambitious (shorter hops compared to non-stop) than his most previous one.

    The main reason I am following his quest is that I believe a great deal of design thought has gone into making sailboats ever faster, but far less has gone into making sailboats which are more user friendly and less less expensive to build and properly outfit and maintain. The next time I go out on a sailboat, it will be to relax not to get a thrill. So my next boat, which I'm in the process of building now, will have a relatively small rig, great ease in reefing, and be beach-able. It is designed to sail on protected waters but to be very easy to launch an retrieve from a bank or a beach. Other than not being ocean worthy, it will share many of the values that the EX LEX design has. But it will have a greater S/D reefed than EX LEX has under full sail (about 7.5 compared to about 4.9).

    After my boat is built and successfully sailed with its present rig design, I am considering experimenting with smaller rigs with S/Ds in the high single figures rather than the low teens.

    This new boat will also be used to test models ocean sailing boats which I have concepts of, but will almost certainly never build.
     
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