You know those beautiful decks......

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by sjptak, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. yipster
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    yipster designer

    [​IMG]

    whats "wrong" with this picture?


    i'd say nothing, longer living, better weight, less cleaning, better price,
    less work but oops yes its synthetic and comes in many variety's too
    its what you want ofcourse, if its gotta be teak then its gotta be teak
    and found no easy way to write my view upside down eighter
     
  2. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Yah...I see more and more of the synthetic decks. Makes sense. I dont know the long term durability but some of the modern products have a nice appearance.

    People tell me that heat absorption is an issue . Teak goes light grey when UV weathered and is cool to the feet . Choose a very light colour if using synthetic.

    Also the sub deck needs to be fair or it will telegraph thru the synthetic. With teak this is not an issue.
     
  3. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It looks OK from a distance.
     
  4. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

  5. sjptak
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    sjptak Junior Member

    Rasorinc, you got it. That is more in line of what I'm looking at. Those other boats and decks are beautiful, but I can only afford a little boat. As neat as the plywood is, it only allows for the straight lines for to aft, but how would one go about putting the deck out line on something like that? That is the effect that I would be wanting to get, though. I've tried posting pics, but my computer skills are limited.

    Stan
     
  6. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

  7. sjptak
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    sjptak Junior Member

    Now those decks are absolutely beautiful! That is what I'd like to be able to do.
     
  8. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Your edge decking--the part that curves in to meet the oposite side at the stem is installed first. Then you would install the ply and all lines would be straight fore to aft. I would fit a piece of plastic as a guide or pattern prior to cutting the plywood.
     
  9. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    veneered Ply will work....but its disadvantaged as a boat deck. Decks take abuse, dings, uv burn and will have to be refinished often. The veneer on ply is so thin that you cant remove a ding or stain by sanding the deck.

    If you choose ply, design the deck so the the whole teak and holly deck ply panel can be removed and replaced...without damaging the covering boards. For example a caulked cover board to deck interface joint with hardware mounted on wood pads...not onto the teak and holly decking.

    Avoid white caulking...uv burns it fast
     
  10. Lurvio
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    Lurvio Mad scientist

    Here's an example of veneered plywood on a Glen-L Malahini.

    Looks kind of ok, surely not something I'd ever but on a boat (but I am a trained carpenter). also with ply, you are quite limited with the deck shape.

    Here's links to the Midnight Cry-projects pictures and blogging about the decking process. You have to note that the fellow is an incurable perfectionist with his boatbuilding hobby. :)

    Daily Musings blog - March 2010 (spread on three pages)

    The picture archive - March 2010 (mostly same pictures as the blog)

    And no, this is not an actual tutorial, but there is plenty of information none the less.

    Lurvio
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Plywood decking is fine for locker covers or a decorating trim, but is a poor material for a deck. The Glen-L link above shows how amateurish a novice might make it. No professional would want their name anywhere near that Glen-L deck. The last link does show a proper laid deck and it does use the spacer method, rather then an edge treatment, but that weird "Z" joint for the side deck transition isn't the way a prop would do it.
     
  12. sjptak
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    sjptak Junior Member

    I read the Midnight Cry blog and you are right. He is an incurable perfectionist. The result is a beautiful boat that any one of us would be proud to own. Beautiful. My skills are nowhere near what I would need for a project like that deck nor would my patience allow me to even think of attempting something like that. Thanks for all the info, though.
     
  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You'll also notice there was no circular saws used to make the grooves in that project as well Sjptak.
     
  14. sjptak
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    sjptak Junior Member

    Nope, I saw no circular saw at all, but that fella sure is talented. I've got the funny feeling that Midnight Cry is not his first project. hee-hee I wish I could do something like that, but my boat will be much, much simpler.

    Stan
     

  15. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can do something like that, it can be tedious and challenging, but if your wife can handle your quirks, you should be able to muster the courage too. More then anything else boat building is about problem solving. Springing deck planks to shape and holding them there as the glue cures can be a difficulty to over come, much like remembering your wedding anniversary without a date tattooed to your wrist. It about accessing the issue(s), drafting up a solution and giving it a shot. Some will be better then others and yet some will have to be ripped out and done again. It's all a normal part of the process.
     
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