Yngling Modifications for Coastal Cruising

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Jamie Kennedy, Jul 4, 2015.

  1. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    I am looking for advice and suggestions.

    So I have a 1981 Yngling with the original layout as shown on left. Since 2001 the rules allow a raised cockpit as shown on the right. I am not going to be racing it, but would like to modify it for coastal cruising, and so I think I might add a double bottom at the level of the seats at the side buoyancy tanks. I may also add automatic bailers on each side just above those tanks. They would be above the waterline when level, and below the operating when heeled. I will be doing a lot of my coast cruising solo. I don't bring a lot of stuff with me, but for storage what I had in mind was to have most of it in four waterproof duffel bags that clip in under the deck, so they would serve as even more addition buoyancy to displace water that might otherwise get into the boat if swamped, and to reduce the free surface effect while bailing. There is a manual bilge pump for what water does get below into the bilge. There is a cuddy forward as you can see, and a mast compression strut which is removeable while at anchor if it needs to be but I may just make it permament.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    So here are some specific ideas and queries, categorized under the old school naval priorities of FLOAT, FLIGHT, FIGHT.

    FLOAT:
    1. Watertight Bulkheads
    I don't want to bring a dinghy or life-raft if I don't need to. I would rather invest the time and energy into keeping this one afloat. The boat has 4 buoyancy tanks, one on each end and one on each side. The fore and aft bulkheads appear to be original plywood but are show some signs of delamination. I think I will just grind off the paint and have a look for now. The side tanks look good. I think I will stick with these 4 compartments, and possibly add some additional bulkheads up to the raised floor level. Perhaps two. One to divide the cockpit in half, either fore and aft or longitudinally, and another at the front of the cockpit. It might totally seal off the cuddy and I would add a hatch for access. I would like access for storage of heavy items and for repairs. Something I am nervous about is being able to make repairs at sea, so I do want to have access, but I also want them to be watertight. Interested in how you might build these bulkheads and raised cockpit floor, including the access hatches. I am a little worried that these additional compartments might make access to the original compartments more difficult.
    2. I have a manual bilge pump. It is in the forward cuddy with the inlet to the bilge and the outlet hose to the foredeck. I may have an electric pump as well, but would still like to have a manual fixed position which I might reposition, and a manual backup handpump and hose. The raised cockpit with automatic bailers as scuppers might make it more efficient if I only have to bail to the raised floor. Of course if I have more water in the boat or the boat is heeled but not moving fast enough I will have to bail over the side. I am not sure of the best way to arrange things for multiple compartments without compromising them. Not sure I want hoses going everywhere. Thoughts?
    3. Repairs at sea. Boat sails well under small jib alone if windy enough, so in most conditions I would drop the main and lash the tiller and hopefully the boat will behave reasonably well on some course or other. So assuming I have gotten away from whatever put a hole in my boat, what should be my strategy for effecting repairs while at sea? What sort of equipment do I need for initial containment, and ultimate repair? Initially I would like to seal off the effected compartment and then sail to safer water and conditions before taking the next step. Next step would be to gain access to it and remove any gear in there and then try to seal the hole well enough then bail it dry then repair it? An interim strategy if it isn't repairable under the conditions might be to throw some gear bags in there to displace most of the water and then seal it off again with the waterproof hatch. Thoughts?

    FLIGHT:
    1. SAILS: I plan on carrying 2 mains, 2 jibs, and the spinnaker, and a sail repair kit for Dacron and nylon. Boat sails well under jib alone in adverse conditions, but wondering if I should add some reef points. If so, should it be at the level such that the head of the main is at the top of the forestay? I can't see this being any worse than sailing under jib alone. It is a very bendy rig and usually not reefed, but when sailing alone, and if things get really lumpy, I think it might make sense. Rather than reef points I might even make the second main precut to size with a new bolt-rope on the foot. It is a small main and fairly manageable and I think changing sail might be as easy as reefing. Any other ideas for alternative sails? Should I have a jury rig worked out in advance?
    2. OARS: I would like to have oars for when becalmed. Boat is 6 feet wide. I think it could be rowed at 2 knots in calm conditions. What is the best arrangement for this? Is a sliding seat necessary? Is standing and facing forward practical, assuming there is a well for my legs past the raised cockpit? What would be the best arrangement for rowing under rough conditions, say after I lost the mast?
    3. ANCHOR: Bay of Fundy has high tides and strong currents. Typically 2 knots along the shores at peak flood and ebb, and more as you get up around Chignecto Bay and Minas Basin where there are some crazy rips as high as 8 knots at Cape Split which really needs to be avoided. So even with an engine I would like to be able to drop anchor to "Stop the Tide". Best anchorages are 30 feet of water but most of the shore is anchorable at 60 feet. Tide adds another 30-50 feet at High Tide, but I am more likely to want to stop the tide on the flood. I have a Danforth and chain and nylon rode. Haven't checked it out yet but it looks to be 20 feet of chain and 100 feet of rode. For stopping the tide in calm conditions I would like to add a disposable grapple anchor and another 200 feet of rode. Some of the bottom is rock and kelp where I might want to stop the tide, so I like the idea of a homemade anchor I can cut and run from if it gets stuck or buried under rocks moving around with the bottom currents. So thoughts on anchors for stopping the tide in light winds. Also anchoring in storm conditions but for the most part I would be sailing under jib and heading for a safe port under those conditions.
    4. Motor: I would rather not fuss with gasoline, and would rather not spend the money on a torpedo or salt water trolling motor, but I might try a cheap fresh water trolling motor. Not sure it would do much for me, but thoughts?

    FIGHT: Well I'm a lover not a fighter, so this is really about sailing, eating, sleeping, and other bodily functions.
    1. For running and anchor lights I think I will use batter operated to cut down on wiring. Comments?
    2. For boiling water, I think I would be most comfortable with alcohol fuel. We can get 95% Ethanol in our local drug store that burns well. From my camping experience I like to dispense and burn small amounts at a time, just enough to boil 500ml or a litre of water at most. Enough to make tea and soup or oatmeal, or burn a pan full of corned beef and potatoes. Any thoughts on a small alcohol burner for making tea while underway solo in a more or less open boat?
    3. For sleeping at anchor I think I would be in the cockpit under a tent over the boom, but I might also have some space forward under the cuddy. I like the idea of being able to sail away in a hurry. It sails ok under the jib in some situations but not others. If I had my small main I think I would always change to that and furl that on the boom to be able to raise it in a hurry under any conditions, and I think it would be fine without the jib under any conditions also. So I think a tent over the boom and mainsail would be ok but only if it can be removed in a hurry. Where is the best place to have a lamp if you need to raise anchor and set sail in a hurry in the dark? A headlamp I suppose. Thoughts?
    4. Navigation. For solo sailing I understand a handheld GPS and chart is considered the way to go these days. We get a lot of fog. I still need to place to lay out a chart, or at least a quarter of a chart. I might have the cuddy set up for that so I can duck in there and study it at anchor and leave it there for reference while sailing. I don't really like the idea of a handheld GPS, but maybe a handheld GPS with a stand.
    5. I don't have any current plans for a self-steering mechanism other than lashing the tiller now and then and possibly a bungee on the jib sheet. As it will be coastal sailing I don't plan on long stretches of 24 hour sailing. It is a bit of a cross between a keelboat and a dinghy. Sometimes it will sail itself for hours with the tiller lashed. Other time it will broach and swamp even with you actively on the helm. I am planning on being tied in all the time.
    6. For bodily functions I am planning on using a bucket and rope. I may add a seat.

    Feel free to make comments and critiques. I am going for a sail on the river now. I will be sailing on the river for at least another month before I head out onto the bay.
     
  2. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Sail went well. Up the other side of Long Island and back in a light to moderate Southerly. Flew the chute down and beat back. Fun boat to sail solo. I think I will start with the basics, fix what is there, clean up the wood. Sail it a lot. I could definitely use some more seats for both standing and sitting. But I do sometimes like to sit or stand with my feet on the bottom. So for this summer I think I will start with some extra seats, but I do want to add hiking straps and ankle straps that are from that raised level. It is a fun boat to sail, but I will eventually want to take it out on the bay. I will aim for late this summer. Lots of river to sail on for now while I shake things out.

    Long Island on Kennebecasis Bay:
    [​IMG]
     
  3. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Looks like a nice area. I have seen a soling converted to a cabin boat for offshore cruising and by the owners account it was a great sea boat.
     
  4. Jamie Kennedy
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    I saw that. The soling does love the heavy air, and even with some extra weight and less hiking I am not surprised it still moves fairly well. I haven't had the Yngling out for a really good stomp yet. I think it is a little more dinghy like so I will have to hike some especially when going solo. I want to get it setup so I can hike it like a Laser to get back in shape for that also. The Kennebecasis is fairly protected but in a strong SSW which is the prevailing summer breeze direction you can get some pretty good waves down at the far end of where you are looking at. That is a view upriver which is Northwest.
     
  5. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I think a small outboard will make your life easier.the trouble with a trolling motor will be when you want to push into a current or weather. It will be useless when you need it most. A small honda with a built in tank is really convenient and you could stow it away when not in use.
     
  6. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    It would for sure, but I am kind of funny that way. I hate the noise and like the challenge, and don't mind rowing or spending a night on the water. An electric trolling motor might be a good compromise for the safety. It would be fun to play around with a small solar charged system. If I do come across an old British Seagull that would be fun too I suppose. I won't go looking just yet though. I borrowed a small plastic kayak to get me to the mooring and back. Worked great. There is a dock very close so I don't need a tender for two. I can't see towing one though as it kills my ability to point. If it was an old schooner it would be different. I have a kayak I need to redeck so that's another project to get to. Hey now maybe I could bring it as a tender and sail as a proa. lol
     
  7. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    There is a fellow in Maine that did some coastal cruising with an Yngling. He had an outboard on the transom but I didn't ask how it handled if the boat was pitching. It would be primarily for calm anyway so probably not an issue. Two people could sit back in the cockpit on either side of the tiller and I would imagine a small long shaft would be just fine. A small engine might store nicely right above the keel when not on the transom. You could secure it to the metal lift points. Would really be in the way either.

    Anyhow. I have a paddle for now. Will get it sailing properly first on the river first. Then oars. Then reconsider what more is required to put to sea. :)
     
  8. messabout
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    May I respectfully remind you that when you are solo and hiking, be damned sure that you are using a safety line attached to yourself.
     
  9. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Thanks. What I have in mind is a safety harness to my chest in addition to hiking straps or stirrups. I think with this boat I can get by with one safety line from a pedestal in the center of the cockpit and I should never have to unclip except when changing clothes. Even then maybe clip it to my ankle until I've changed and put the harness back on. I might even use it on the river once it is set up just to make it a habit.
     
  10. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Went for a sail last night around Kennebecasis Island...
    [​IMG]

    Found a stoway in the fo'c's'le under some sails and put him to work...
    [​IMG]
     
  11. cmckesson
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    Location: Vancouver BC

    cmckesson Naval Architect

    May I suggest that you will need more anchor cable than you have listed.

    Here in British Columbia we have similar situations although our tides are only ~15 feet. To await a change in the current I don't always have the luxury of picking my spot. That means anchoring in as much as 80+ feet of water.

    To this end I suggest you want at least 300' of anchor line. I carry just under that amount, and it is not infrequent that I wish I had more.

    Of course, on the Ynling this can be pretty small line (1/4" ?) so its not much burden to carry, and thus is cheap insurance.

    Chris
     
  12. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    A mighty fine looking stowaway you have found.
     
  13. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

    Looking good and nice to see your child with you - fantastic.

    Because I live far from the water, good sleeping arrangements have always been very important to me. I have to sleep over at least 2 nights. That's why I leave on a Friday afternoon and come back Sunday mornings. This way I have the whole of Saturday on the water.
    A good boom tent is great, use your cuddy for dry storage.

    A small outboard will change you life and I agree :-
    lovely boat :)
     
  14. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Thanks for that. Yes one of the things I want to play around with is "stopping the tide" when sailing up the Bay of Fundy in light winds. As the old schooners used to do they would navigate more with the anchor and tides than with the wind and sails. The wind would be light under such conditions, but the water might be 60-80 feet plus another 30-40 feet of tide when I need to anchor and wait for the tide to turn again. The wind and current tends to be better along the shoreline so you can depend on that depth, and you might get to a better anchorage in 30 feet plus tide. In light winds you don't have the wind to contend with but you will still have 2 knots of current at peak, and more at the very head of the Bay. You wouldn't necessarily need full scope, and dragging anchor wouldn't be the end of the world, but fouling an anchor could be costly. So I hope to experiment with some homemade anchors, limit the chain to perhaps 20 feet, and use 1/4" nylon on a spool. For serious anchoring in foul weather I will have my primary anchoring system. It will probably need the same length or more even though it wouldn't need to be used to the same depth. It would just be heavier to use and more costly to lose, but full holding power for a storm. The boat sails well in adverse conditions so I should be able to run for cover or at least to a 'better' anchorage, but there are not a lot of places to hide up the Bay. I also have to wait and see what the capability is of using oars with this boat in rough weather. Should be fun to play around with, one step at a time.
     

  15. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    That is not my son. Here is his father. Shanghaid him as well. ;-)
    [​IMG]

    I am going to work out the sleeping arrangements and camping gear. There is certainly room for two. I agree the boom tent is the way to go, with the cuddy for storage.
     
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