Yet another "I want to build a boat to cross the Pacific" thread

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by fixerdave, Dec 21, 2012.

  1. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Another way to " Get Smart" about boats, the cruising lifestyle, geography, gear, expenses... is to charter a boat off season.

    The rates goes way down off season .
     
  2. bpw
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Cruising

    bpw Senior Member

    On our last big passage on our 28 footer we averaged 80 miles per day (24 hours), We would do a bit better in trade wind conditions, but still not very common for us to do better than 100 miles per day.

    We have no engine but that makes little difference since most boats in the 30 foot range will not carry enough fuel to motor much on a long passage.

    Certainly not a very efficient or cost effective way to get anywhere....

    Doing multiple single-handed pacific crossings a year would be pretty brutal.
     
  3. 805gregg
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Ojai, Ca

    805gregg Junior Member

    You just need a different boat, a 28' Bristol Channel Cutter Xepius made the run down to the Marqueses averaging 140 miles a day with a best day of 180 miles, my BCC sister ship cruises under power at 6 knots using 1 quart per hr giving my boat Nerissa a under power range of 750 miles.
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The OP wants a "fat" boat. 4kt average is what he will probably get.
     
  5. nimblemotors
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Sacramento

    nimblemotors Senior Member

    A submarine is your best option here, avoid the bad weather above,
    train some whales to tow you. Or just ride the currents, they loop around the pacific. That seems a practical plan for commuting between continents.
     
  6. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Now your talkin nimble!
     
  7. fixerdave
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    Location: West Coast Canada

    fixerdave Junior Member

    Even better than trained whales, how about I just buy some used nuclear powered ex-boomer. That eliminates, weather, fuel, and my storage space issues all at once. All I have to do is wait for world peace and those boats should get pretty cheap on the used market. Of course, they'll have pretty limited range as most of the oceans will be solid blocks of ice, what with hell freezing over and all that ;)

    On a slightly more reasonable note, I wouldn't be surprised if in a hundred years the notion of personal subs with wacky hull designs and surface coating making high-speed kite-sail propulsion (or something else) entirely routine. Well, I'd be surprised if I lived long enough to see it, but my kid might. There will be no trained whales though. By then, they'll have internationally protected inalienable rights. Be more acceptable to have a galley full of slaves manning oars :D

    As for me... well, it looks like I'll be taking the plane,

    David...
     
  8. nimblemotors
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    nimblemotors Senior Member

    That doesn't sound very exciting at all, anyone can do that.
    The least you can do is get a motorhome and drive it as far as you can,
    I hear the alaska highway is at least really dangerous.
     
  9. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    Nonsense. It would be considered a darn good road in many parts of the world. I averaged 600 miles a day on it in 2000. Towing a 30' TT with a halfton ford, 302 engine. That was when a lot was still gravel. Biggest danger was broken glass. I looked like a motorized cardboard box because I covered everything with cardboard for rock protection. The haulers and log trains showered you will walnut sized road base. It is entirely paved now.
     
  10. fixerdave
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    Location: West Coast Canada

    fixerdave Junior Member

    Well, that's my old stomping grounds... actually learned to drive on the logging roads up past Stewart and the like, when I was 12. I remember having to wake my father up to make the 3-2 shift as I couldn't hold the clutch down and reach that far at the same time :) Even now, when I want to go play, it's out in the bush. Truthfully, if I could drive to Japan, I would, and if it was nasty 4x4 track I'd be even happier. I hate flying. Well, no, I don't mind flying. I hate being flown, or driven, or sailed. I have some kind of weird control thing going on. Put me behind the wheel/stick and I'll be happy... might die happy as I can't say I'm the best at said control, but weird control things are like that :p Probably a big part of why I want a boat.

    But, fear not... I may entertain you yet. After looking at 30' sailboats, well, now I'm thinking 40'. Silly curved hulls and all make for a lot of wasted space. I mean, I spent over a decade in a 24' RV (the result of the last time I felt like I do now). Seems like way more space than a 30' sail. Boat-houses might be another option though... so you might get me asking how long it would take to cruise across the Bering Strait and harbour-hop down the Kamchatka Peninsula ;) Maybe I'll do it solar powered for fun, assuming the recycled women's underwear kite sail doesn't work out as planned.

    David...
     

  11. bpw
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Cruising

    bpw Senior Member

    The trip to the Marquesas is a lot quicker than Panama to Valdivia, since you have both current and wind going with you. Our trip to Valdivia was close hauled almost the whole way and no current to help.

    But I won't argue that a BCC would be quicker than our boat, deeper and much more powerful hull shape. Though I Still doubt you could count on much more than 100 miles a day anywhere but the trades, unless you where willing to motor through calms.

    Without an engine the calm spots really kill the average, what would take 12 hours to motor through can take a few days to sail through, and those 10-20 mile days are hell on you average. Going from Southern Mexico to Costa Rica we only managed about 35 miles per day made good, including the three days it took us to go the last 20 miles into Bahia Ballena.
     
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