YDS CAD Course in Rhino?

Discussion in 'Education' started by ctosuner, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. ctosuner
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: Istanbul, Turkey

    ctosuner New Member

    I'm a naval architect and would like to enroll one of the yacht design courses soon. I know very well that Rhino is a must, so I was looking for the Rhino courses specializes in marine part and found that YDS has that course.

    Is there anyone that took the course from YDS? Does it worth to get it and is it enough to be able to work on Rhino? I am also curious, which one is it better, to get that course after or before the yacht design course in order to maximize the benefit?

    Thanks in advance

    Cuneyt
     
  2. Michael Chudy
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Michael Chudy Yacht Designer

    The Rhino course offered by YDS is very good at what it does - instruct you in using Rhino for yacht design. If you know nothing about Rhino I would encourage you to take a "Level One" training course first to get grounded in the program. They are offered by McNeel and also by YDS. As you are already a NA, I'm not sure what to advise about taking the CAD and the regular design course concurrently. Normaly I would advise someone to begin yacht design drawing by hand. The problem with CAD is that an inexperienced designer can let the software dictate shape, whereas you need to be knowledgable enough to know what you want. You can do the whole YDS course in CAD if you wish, and in my opinion, that would be to your advantage in terms of saving time if you are familiar enough with the software. By the way, do you now use AutoCad or a clone of it? Rhino is great for design, but you will find, even in V4, it is limited in doing final 2D drawings, and you will want to transfer the 2D lines from Rhino to a 2D CAD program for the best looking results.
    Michael
     
  3. ctosuner
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    ctosuner New Member

    Thanks Michael for your advice, although I'm a young NA, I have not so much experience about designing yacht, that's why I'm considering yacht design course but of course I know the basic.

    I am working in a boatbuilding company now and able to use Autocad. As you've mentioned, I need to use Rhino and Autocad together. So I need to learn Rhino by myself and the enroll Rhino course for specific yacht design of YDS.

    The point that I can't be sure is that I need to start yacht design course and learn how to design yacht by hand as you advise, and the after being capable of it, enrolling Rhino course. I guess you agree with me.

    Cuneyt
     
  4. Raggi_Thor
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

  5. CaptScot
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    CaptScot Junior Member

    Hi, Is anybody familiar with AutoYacht? Its a new YD software from AutoShip. I don't have the link to it off hand, but as the name implies this is suppose to be a type of AutoCad specifically for yacht design, not ships. I was just wondering how this compared to Rhino as to a student price, ease of use, and learning curve.

    I emailed Rhino with questions about their software a few days ago, but they have yet to reply. When some people and companies are unresponsive it makes you start to wonder.
     
  6. Raggi_Thor
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

  7. Raggi_Thor
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    Location: Trondheim, NORWAY

    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

    I think it's better to email a local dealer aboout Rhino and RhinoMarine.
    We sell those programs in Norway and Europe.
    Each module of Rhinomarine is 100 Euro for students.
    Rhino 4.0 is 195 Euro for students.
    I think the price in USA and Canada (and elsewhere?) is the same amount in USD.
     
  8. dgerr
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    dgerr Senior Member

  9. DavidJ
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    DavidJ Senior Member

    AutoYacht isn't really different from AutoShip. It is just a lower feature version. I think it is around 800 bucks.

    The AutoShip products are NOT like AutoCAD. AutoCAD is a 2D drafting program(though it can do 3D). AutoCAD is almost always required as well for producing nice quality production drawings.

    AutoShip is hull modeling software. It's direct competitors would be Maxsurf, Multisurf, ProSurf, Prolines, Fastship, and Freeship/Delfthship.

    Rhino is a 3D design program. It is the only really multipurpose program of the bunch. While it doesn't have as many features for 2D as AutoCAD it can do it(Rhino 4 offers much more than other versions). It is also possible to produce a fair hull with Rhino. The Rhino marine packages seem to make it more like the full fledged hull modelers.

    Most professionals will use several programs. Hull modeling software, general 3D design software, and general 2D design software. Often more software is used to design structure(ShipConstructor, etc), or other specialized components. Still more may be used for stability(GHS, etc). Rhino is very commonly used in industry, though mostly to make pretty pictures. I'm not sure if any professionals use only Rhino, but for a student it is probably the only real option(possibly TurboCAD).
     
  10. Michael Chudy
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Michael Chudy Yacht Designer

    David,
    What software you use for design varies depending on the size of vessel you are working with. As a yacht and small craft designer, working with vessels up to about 200 feet, I see no need to use any software other than Rhino. I used to use 2D (Turbocad) to complement Rhino 3, but Rhino 4 has made that unnecessary. And if you don't have to, who would want to deal with the pain in the butt that AutoCad or it's clones are to work with? Rhino is not just for making "pretty pictures". It is not just "possible", but easy to make a fair hull with Rhino, "exactly" the shape you want. Plus the super structure, framing, interior, one off parts, and on and on. The catch is that you have to know enough about yacht design to be able to use it. It won't make a hull for you. What good yacht designer would want that? You make the hull the way you want to. Though Rhino Marine offers some quick and easy plug-ins, most of what it offers can actually be done in the basic Rhino by a competent designer.
    Michael
     
  11. Raggi_Thor
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

    Personally I like AutoCAD (and some of it's clones), but I remember it was hard to learn, and I see now when I teach that AutoCAD is archaic or old fashioned in many ways. BUT Rhino is not very different, just better in many ways, for example you can type commands, but only have to remember the first letters, in acad you have to type RO or ROTATE for Rotate (Not R or ROT or ROTA), in Rhino you can start typing and see what's in the list, just one of many examples.

    I think RhinoMarine's dynamic sections is a very useful feature. In (pure) Rhino you can make a script that delete all sections and redraw them, but that's some work. Stability and hydrostatics for different loading conditions can also be time consuming with pure Rhino (not Marine).
     
  12. chandler
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    chandler Senior Member

    Michael,
    Since you are in eastport, What do you know about the systems course at washington county comm. college?
     

  13. Michael Chudy
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Michael Chudy Yacht Designer

    Chandler-
    I can't tell you much about the systems course. My limited involvement as part time instructor has been in the Marine Drafting and Lofting areas. Best to call the head instructor, Dean Pike, who operates Moose Island Marine here in Eastport. The Boat School has had a lot of problems over the past few years due to a lack of commitment from the overseeing college, Washington County Community College. Luckily, the school is being taken over this year by Husson College, and will go back to it's roots as a Marine Technical Training Center. Dean's number is 207-853-6058.
    Michael
     
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