Would you like to work in Linux vs. Windows?

Discussion in 'Software' started by tux, Nov 17, 2002.

?

Interested in Linux?

  1. Yes I like Linux for its great stability

    20 vote(s)
    40.0%
  2. Yes I like the idea of Linux because it is free/open source

    19 vote(s)
    38.0%
  3. The lack of software is still holding me back from installing Linux

    11 vote(s)
    22.0%
  4. No I already am comfortable in Windows – why learn yet another OS?

    8 vote(s)
    16.0%
  5. No Windows is still an easier OS to use than Linux

    3 vote(s)
    6.0%
  6. How about other flavors of Unix like FreeBSD

    3 vote(s)
    6.0%
  7. I want more software for Mac / Max OSX

    7 vote(s)
    14.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. jonathan
    Joined: Feb 2003
    Posts: 93
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    Location: France

    jonathan Junior Member

    I am currently looking at using Linux for my design work, but most of the software that I use is Windows-only. I have installed a Debian wich works very well, and gave WINE a go but it is incapable of running my design software (AutoCAD, Multisurf).
    Would anybody have had the same experience and found solution, or is it just a dead end ?

    Thanks.
     
  2. jprev
    Joined: May 2003
    Posts: 37
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    Location: Florida

    jprev Junior Member

    Did you hear the joke about...

    Bill Gates and the auto executive having lunch?

    Gates was bragging that if his company was building cars they would be getting 100 miles per gallon and cost $99.99!

    The auto exec smiled and said that was wonderful, but he didn't think people would like driving a car that crashed three times a day.

    :D

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  3. snakefeet
    Joined: Sep 2002
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Savannah, GA, USA

    snakefeet Junior Member

    general follow up

    Back in September I talked up RedHat and their subscription plan. Shortly thereafter I decided to 'eat my own dogfood' and give it a try. Its a bit anticlimactic but if you've read this thread this far, I guess l should at least give you a summary of how it went.

    RedHat 9 was nice. A month after I got it installed RedHat announced that they were dropping the RedHat Linux line in favor of their business-oriented (and profitable) RedHat Enterprise Linux line. Entry price: $179.

    I then considered my options to be the Fedora Project (an offshoot of RedHat), Debian and BSD. There are a lot of good things about the BSD projects. Their lineage traces directly back to the original UNIX. They have a much more central and controlled development process. Over 10,000 pieces of software have been ported to FreeBSD. And I still want to try a BSD. But week of evenings spent unsuccessfully trying to get FreeBSD running on one of my boxes forced me to shelve that idea for now.

    In fact, I've regressed! I reformatted my RedHat installation to make room to back up files from another windows box. A Knoppix CD saved my skin during this process - but that's another story.

    I think I'll try Debian next, or maybe it's offshoot, Gentoo that I've been hearing a lot about.

    These machines and different software packages are fun in a way. But I must say that for drafting, my old rolls of mylar and box of lead holders and technical pens look more and more appealing every day.
     
  4. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    The lack of 3D software for the Mac is a very annoying myth. There are plenty of excellent CAD / 3D software for the Mac and many of them are more well designed than on Windows.

    VectorWorks is an example where you get real 3D, real solid modeling, very good general purpose 2D drafting and it is much easier to use than AutoCAD. Around here it also costs less than AC LT, so to me it is an enigma why anyone buys AC at all.

    True that MaxSurf has not been updated since December 1998 (I think), but there are alternatives. Check out TouchCAD (www.touchcad.com), which is shipped in both Mac and Windows versions, including MacOSX, which is a UNIX based system without being UNIX messy to handle.

    /C
     
  5. Robert Miller
    Joined: Dec 2003
    Posts: 95
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 12
    Location: Rhode Island

    Robert Miller Junior Member

    I too have no wish to start (or join) a Windows/Linux/MacOS war, or any other sort of war for hat matter.

    For me... it's simple:

    I like things that work, better than things that don't.
    I like things that work well, better than things that don't.

    Unix, or some form of Unix, is the most stable commonly available language around at this time.
    MacOS 10 and Linux are both UNIX based.
    Compared with Linux, Mac OS10 is far the smoother, slicker interface.
    Mac graphics use the same graphics engines as any high end machine may use.
    The bus speed of the Mac G5 exceeds any other desktop, and a dual G5 can render faster than any other platform available to us.
    Windows? Yeah... there are some good software packages, but... Windows crashes. The OS is illogical. Backward compatability? Doesn't exist.

    My preferences then?
    MacOS10>Linux>>>>>>>>>>>>....>>>.... windows

    Windows crashes. Period.

    Robert
     
  6. ludesign
    Joined: Aug 2003
    Posts: 211
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 60
    Location: Sweden

    ludesign Senior Member

    TouchCAD is as far as I know the only generic MacOS 10 hull fairing program around. It's also available for MacOS Classic (8.6 to 9.2 or) Windows 32. It may even be available for Linux if there is a demand for it. If you are interested in a Linux version I suggest that you contact Lundstrom Design and make a request (contact info at www.touchcad.com ).
     
  7. ABoatGuy
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 208
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 79
    Location: LeftCoast

    ABoatGuy Member

    I play on a Mac (OSX) and work in Windows (Vista & 7).

    Most specialized main stream marine software is simply not available in anything but Windows and to tell you the truth it has been a long time since I have had Windows (v7 in particular crash).

    The OS is simply a tool to run the aps you need to get a job done. If it isn't crashing I'm good to go. It doesn't seem to be the issue it did in the past.

    That said, competition is always a good thing to keep the OS builders on their toes. I have no problems with Linux - I have messed around with it, but to get the job done in this industry, it is Windows.
     
  8. jonr
    Joined: Sep 2008
    Posts: 721
    Likes: 11, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 57
    Location: Great Lakes

    jonr Senior Member

    I run Linux with Windows running under VMWare. The best of both worlds. Both are stable for me.
     
  9. brosen
    Joined: Mar 2004
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Babylon, NY

    brosen New Member

    I run Linux, and then Windows XP under VMware on Linux. Everything works good. Linux does have limitations, mainly in the available software applications. On the other hand, Windows XP seems to cooperate better with VMware's "virtual" hardware that it does when installed directly onto real hardware.
     
  10. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 6,823
    Likes: 120, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1882
    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    I use the 64 bit "main edition" of linux mint on my 3 machines to be installed on-board soon, as the painting, inside and out on my build, will be the second weekend of September, and shortly thereafter she will be pulled out of the shed and presented to all on the turf outside where I will finish fitout...

    Linux Mint can be downloaded here http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

    Mint has matured over the years and is now a breeze to install - Plug everything in, and switch on... Make sure you have broadband available to download the updates and special drivers (will do this semi automatically) then commence the installation process... I use a HP color Laserjet CP1215, and download their driver... Everything works a treat.... NO VIRUS woes, GOOD and easily configured firewall, plays videos from everywhere (a necessity if International cruising) and 2 big LCD screens make all tasks a breeze.... I have set the system to give me 3 more 3360 x 1080 screens that I can flick to with ease... Comes with "wine" if I ever need to run a Windows application?... I am MORE secure than Windows will ever be and can easily install encryption to defy the eyes of the best hackers or CIA/FBI or whoever if need be?...
     
  11. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    Mac ..............
     
  12. Brian@BNE
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 262
    Likes: 13, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 151
    Location: Brisbane, Australia

    Brian@BNE Senior Member

    I'm into 4th month with MAC, but also have Windows 7 installed. For heavy apps I'll boot up in W7. Otherwise boot up in MAC and use either W7 or XP (both installed via VMware Fusion) for short Windows-only stuff without needing to shut down MAC. Just set up hardware with a lot of RAM and this is all a breeze.

    Yes, Windows versions of apps are more feature rich than the MAC versions. But everything Windows became bloated and slow. I don't miss it at all.
     
  13. tom kane
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 1,767
    Likes: 47, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 389
    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

    Love Linux Mint......
     
  14. ludesign
    Joined: Aug 2003
    Posts: 211
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 60
    Location: Sweden

    ludesign Senior Member

    TouchCAD has identical features in the Mac and Windows versions, and I do all my design work on Mac.
     

  15. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 1,170
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    Location: North Texas

    Rurudyne Senior Member

    I would like to say that I've been able to use a number of Windows programs, including DelftShip and HullForm, under the MacOS on an Intel Mac using Wine with no problems.

    Wine itself is free.
     
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