Would this work? (cutting a 15' fiberglass canoe in half to make a stable dinghy)

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by SpiritWolf15x, Nov 2, 2012.

  1. SpiritWolf15x
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    SpiritWolf15x Senior Member

    Would cutting a 15' fiberglass canoe in half at the widest point and glassing a 1/2" plywood transom into it make a stable, usable 7.5foot dinghy or would it just sink?

    I'm not planing on doing this with my existing canoe, I'm just curious... =P
     
  2. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    It would probably float, but it sure wouldn't carry much of load, I doubt even an adult.
     
  3. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    The canoe's carrying capacity would be divided in half. It would be better to remove both bow and stern, maybe 3 1/2 ft each. Then it would carry an adult with no problem. If the transoms were angled (bow maybe 30 degrees, stern 10-15 degrees), it would row okay or even motor--- however slowly.
     
  4. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

    It works decent, guys do it for hunting quite often here.
     
  5. nukisen
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    nukisen Senior Member

    Why not cut it in the middle longitudinal and place the sheet in the cutted area.
    Then you are able to use it as a catamaran. :)
     
  6. SpiritWolf15x
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    SpiritWolf15x Senior Member

    I might end up doing just that. As it is just sitting in my yard now.
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If you could cut it at 9' it would be much better.
     
  8. nukisen
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    nukisen Senior Member

    Else you can cut it just in half. Glue a pair of boot in the bottom and use it for walking on water as Jesus. :D

    Anyway you have good oportunity to have fun as a creative person. I bet you will have som fun with it. :)
     
  9. nukisen
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    nukisen Senior Member

    Spiritwolf!
    Did you make any fun out of your canoe?
    Would be fun to know.
     
  10. SpiritWolf15x
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    SpiritWolf15x Senior Member

    Nah, it's sitting at the side of my house being ignored, I ended up finding a steal of a deal on a 8' fiberglass lapstrake rowing dinghy so I just went with that.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

    Nice boat !
     
  12. SpiritWolf15x
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    SpiritWolf15x Senior Member

    Yeah it's not a bad find for 350$
     

  13. wayne nicol
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    wayne nicol Senior Member

    cut the canoe in half, a transom for each half, bolt them together, use as a long canoe- or two shorties when needed.
     
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