Would this make a good domestic cat?

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by easywake, Oct 24, 2010.

  1. easywake
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 12
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Pennsylvania

    easywake Junior Member

    I came across this concept drawing the other day and it seems to be a lot of what I am looking for in a live aboard boat. The designer states that there are no plans for this boat. A 3d model can be viewed at www.triloboats.com/modeltours.html

    I would like to keep the beam to 14ft max so as to be able to road transport the boat complete. It seems like a practical design that would allow a lot of cabin space and a good amount of space for tankage and utilities in the hulls. Probably plywood/epoxy construction. I would also be curious as to if anyone has seen a similar boat or plans before.
    This is to be a long term project after one or two smaller boats for building experience. Any feedback will be greatly appreciated. Russ
     

    Attached Files:

  2. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    A well planned out cat has a lots of room that can be used as accomidation !. What sort of power would you be thinking about to get from point A to point b etc . Tankage for fuel and water . Could use a single motor and use hydralic drives for the two props along with the capstain etc and the same motor for generator to charge a bank of deep cycle batteries for lighting etc . Gas for cooking and refridg :confused::(:?::idea::D:p:p
     
  3. easywake
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 12
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Pennsylvania

    easywake Junior Member

    Had originally been thinking of twin outboards, but the hydraulic drive sounds fascinating. I will look into that. Probably some solar panels. LP for stove and fridge seems most practical.
    My biggest concern is narrowing the beam to 14 ft to keep it highway movable with reasonable resources. I have friends in the manufactured home business to help with moving and 14W is the norm with them. I like the 40L x 20W configuration, but I would need to have the hulls separate and the bridge deck/cabin in sections small enough to transport. Not sure if my skills would be up to that. This is going to be a home build for our retirement cruising. Looking mostly for an ICW cruiser with the capability for a fair weather passage to the Bahamas. Building for further island hopping will probably be beyond my resources (but very desirable;))
    I have zero design experience with boats of this nature. I am looking for suggestions to wring out a rough plan before I hire the plans out.
    Any discussion will be greatly appreciated! Russ
     
  4. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Bahamas?

    Not with such boat. And the desire to stay narrow for road transport, even restricts your areas on inland waterways!

    Either, or!

    Sorry for that.

    Richard
     
  5. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 2,208
    Likes: 165, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1244
    Location: Back full time in the UK

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I have a proposal for a boat like that, see my New Designs page of my website, righthand side.

    And it is designed to go to the Bahamas

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  6. easywake
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 12
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Pennsylvania

    easywake Junior Member

    Richard, does that come from the narrow beam idea, or do you feel it would still not be suitable in the 40 x 20 configuration as shown. If the beam needs to be wide with this type of boat, I would be willing to try to work around the transport thing. I'm about 55 miles from the Phila. area to get it into the water. I'm sure there must be a workable solution. Are all big cats built at the water? (gently please, I'm new to all this :p)
     
  7. easywake
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 12
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Pennsylvania

    easywake Junior Member

    R. Wood, Thanks, that's an attractive boat. I will keep you in mind. Russ
     
  8. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 794
    Likes: 43, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 324
    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    http://www.strandednaked.com/



    This Houseboat goes from West Palm to Abaco in the Bahamas every year. In the summer you pick your day and with a 5 knt boat its a 10 hr crossing. In the summer the conditions are very easy to forecast with typically only the occasional thunderstorm to worry about. When I was much younger I sailed my Hobie 16 along with 2 other Hobies from Miami to Bimini in the Bahamas.

    I personally think its a mistake to try and make a catamaran trailerable, too much compromise. If you want trailerable stick to a monohull.

    A couple of 4 stroke outboards will serve a catamaran like that well for a reasonable cost and reasonable economy underway. Better would be inboard diesel but big initial investment with long wait for return.

    Hydraulic drives are proven, but not necessarily off the shelf drive units and I believe in the end more expensive than 2 diesels (considering that the hydraulic drive was to be diesel) There is also a fair amount of energy lost in transmission with a hydraulic drive and no redundancy.

    Steve
     

    Attached Files:


  9. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    My concern was beam, yes.
    And no matter what others may have done (the most silly idea is not always the best proven), crossing open water in a craft designed for sheltered waters is not safe. The given example might never have met a fast running tug nearby? If that happens they probably know better, all weather forecasts ignored.

    Of course not all wide craft are built at the coastline. I produce yachts up to 9m width, with 400tonnes displ. 20km from shore.

    Just pick your design appropriate for the task, not for the road transport, that was what I meant.

    People tend to imagine more requirements than they have in reality, the ocean crossing trailer sailer is one mad example.

    Regards
    Richard
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.