Would that catamaran ever sail?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by john5346, Apr 23, 2013.

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  1. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    As others have said, posts like this are common on this forum

    If it really did sail well and really was simple and quick to build don't you think professional boat yards would be building similar boats?

    Water doesn't like going round corners. Look at a fast moving river, in the flat bottom areas the water is smooth. Put in some rocks and it is turbulent.

    I sailed a junk rigged boat for the first time last year. Worst sailing boat I've ever sailed. Very slow, didn't go to windward at all and ropes everywhere.

    I once watched the Hill's sail Badger to windward in the Caribbean. And I've seen Jester sailing, again a very slow boat on all points of sail

    In these days of lightweight, easily handled mainsails, good deck gear and roller furling headsails I see no point in the junk rig. Maybe it had its place in the early 1960's but not now. And of course the Chinese used it because they didn't have sailcloth, only split bamboo.

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  2. tomas
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    tomas Senior Member

    Hahahahahahahahahaha...


    I'm not being mean. This just really made me laugh very hard!
    I wish I could have seen Leo's facial reaction when he read this!

    Oh man, my cheek muscles are hurting...


    Welcome to the forum, john5346.
     
  3. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

  4. tomas
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    tomas Senior Member

  5. tomas
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    tomas Senior Member

    So john5346, have a look at these:

    from
    http://www.rclandsailing.com/catamaran/design.html#hull
    [​IMG]


    and this one from:
    http://smalltridesign.com/Trimaran-Articles/Trimaran-Performance-and-Plywood.html
    [​IMG]

    Notice how the second picture shows the shapes over a canoe-type profile.
     
  6. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    Thanks for the laughs. That thread was hilarious.:D
     
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  7. john5346
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    john5346 Junior Member

    I use linux and free software since 98. The idea of paying anything for software or consulting even if it is valid in the busines world is not something that happens that much. It was novelty for me. :)
     
  8. john5346
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    john5346 Junior Member

    I looked and yesterday I went to search for boats with the triangular and rectangle shape.

    Initially, think of cargo or cruise ships. It is a FAT triangle+rectangle, sure withe the connection between those two geometries beveled but it is still that shape.

    After that, look at rowing canoes used in the olympics.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Then after that I found these boats in some threads in this forum.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/at...1d1245477506-pedal-powered-boats-p6190093.jpg

    then finally a Navy boat, they would not spend money on useless things, right? oh wait :)
    I read that story of that and it seems it works fine.

    [​IMG]

    Then.. what do I think about it now if even the Navy builts it ?


    :?::?::?::?:

    Thank you :)
     

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  9. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

    The sad truth is that he did build and finish his dream "triangulated box"

    BUT

    what he saved on a lousy "design" - he wasted on fuel
    it became a gas guzzler with limited range

    AND WORSE STILL

    now he is stuck with a "personal" creation with NO MARKET VALUE

    the hull is only 10% of the boat
    so why build a piece of junk?

    AND as a foot note
    the long slender "rowboats" are not triangle boxes
    go and do a bit more homework on those hull designs
     

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  10. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

  11. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    I have to agree here. Those rowboats are nothing like your triangle box design. As for that other submarine thing, obviously stealth rated higher in the SOR than performance.

    I think your design will sail, but my question is why would you bother with such a ugly and poor performing hull when it will be more rewarding and not much harder to build a decent hull?

    Large ship hulls are certainly more complicated than a rectangle with a point. However they do have slab sides. This is not because its best for performance though. Its because its the best compromise to hold cargo and sit flush with docks when loading/unloading.
     
  12. john5346
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    john5346 Junior Member

    Only because it is easier to build. Initially, you build the rectangular body in plywood. Then after you make the triangle part. 2 separate pieces, then epoxy them together, screw them together or any other way of joining the triangle and rectangle. Doesnt that sound easy to build?

    You agree that it will sail but not with the same performance of a properly designed hull and I agree with that too and does that matter at all? Look at the popularity of sit-on-top kayaks, they are much slower than a sea kayak but still people have fun in it. I remember one of the most fun days I had sailing was on board of a sailing boat that was going slowly while everyone was drinking wine during sunset. I think sailors are not that much concerned with speed or they would use a motorboat. Sure, I am only speculating here and I cant affirm anything due to my inexperience in boats but it seems to be the case for the normal folks or the sailing people.
     
  13. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    NO! it doesn't. You'd have to make the matching ends of the rectangular part and the triangular part EXACTLY the same, square and same widths all over. Very tricky to do for an expert. Definitely not for someone looking for an easy build.

    If you want to build a beach cat I would strongly suggest stitch and glue/tortured ply. If you don't want to pay for plans then you can download the Olympic Tornado plans for free.

    If you want a cruising boat I suggest you check out the Slider cat or my larger 22ft Janus.

    Ships travel very slowly for their length compared to small catamarans.

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2013
  14. Alex.A
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    Alex.A Senior Member


  15. john5346
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    john5346 Junior Member

    Hi Richard, thanks for the suggestions but how is a triangle made of plywood difficult?

    Isnt it only beveling of the edges, attaching the 3 sides and filling the gaps with epoxy? Sounds like the easiest thing to do.

    [​IMG]

    I think yes, right?
     
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