Worth repairing?

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by partgypsy, Apr 7, 2011.

  1. partgypsy
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    partgypsy Junior Member

    Here are a couple of pics of a boat that needs a new home. Anyone want to chime in on whether it's worth it? How many hours it might take?
    I have not been on board, but there's enough work here to give an idea. The closeup is of the bottom of the transom.
     

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  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It is expensive for free. Usually there is a charge to the owner to dispose of it.
     
  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Unless you have a great deal of experience with repairs and restoration, run as fast as you can in the opposite direction from this old Connie up there in "Marlboro" country.
     
  4. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    It is not as bad as it looks. Most of the problems can be solved with a chainsaw, for what remains an excavator is an excellent tool.

    My guess is that building new is cheaper in the end...
     
  5. partgypsy
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    partgypsy Junior Member

    Glib isn't helpful

    Thanks for the responses... and you are probably right. I was hoping for a little more substance from self-proclaimed "experts".
     
  6. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Well Im not an expert you understand but heres a bit more substance.

    I would not let you give it to me.

    Run--don't walk.

    Save the money and blow most of it on women and booze ,--the rest, just waste it!!

    Sorry --its just not worth the time for what it is. Its obviously been there a long time --why is that?
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'm not sure if I'm a
    but I have been paid for restoration and repairs from time to time in the last 30+ years.

    Again, if you have considerable experience with these types of repairs, then go for it, but other wise, (again) run. The damage shown is usually indicative of the rest of the boat. I can run through a list of areas where you'll have "issues", but what's the point.
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I'll take your money. The boat is worth about -(minus) $2500.00
     
  9. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    Over time, I have (had) many customers jumping in an adventure similar to this. Only a very, very small percentage of customers really finish such a project. Most of them (over 90%) abandon the project, but only after tossing in various amounts of money. The ones that do finish the project mostly admit that building new would be faster and cheaper.

    One of my closer friends picked up a similar project, of a 1930s racing sailboat of 8 meters. (for the Dutch connaisseur: a "Regenboog"). He found some customer that was interested in a restoration. Restoring was done in a very efficient way: Cut out the wooden part that had the registration number in it, build a new boat, and recess the old part in. Presto.
    The remains were cut into pieces, and when cutting it was found out that, although the boat still looked reasonable, most of the wood was not even to be recovered for other projects. Skin was bad, frames were bad, keelson was bad. Deck was already gone. Only some smaller pieces were cleaned and returned into the new boat, or into other projects.

    And do not worry, car restorers usually work in the same way. Even Porsche Classic is known to take old bodies, cut out the chassis number, and weld them into new bodies.
     
  10. anthony goodson
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    anthony goodson Senior Member

    partygypsy,your second post on this thread was unnecessarily sarcastic ,since PAR, Herman Frosty and Gonzo have done the gentlemanly thing and risen above this ,I will take the opportunity to point it out. Like so many others ,when you don't get the answer you want you are unhappy,the fact that the anwers have probably saved you a lot of heartache and money doesn't occur to you. There is no need to elaborate on a definitive "no" ,and added humour is just there to attempt to soften the blow. These people are not" self styled" experts ,they are recognised as such by us here in this community ,and are willing to give up their time to help you, perhaps an apology is in order.
     
  11. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    No apology necessary for me!
     
  12. bntii
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    bntii Senior Member



    We have a similar classic beauty up in the back lot.
    Every few years we find another man of character and substance to take on her restoration (and pay the yard fees..)

    She has earned her keep.
     
  13. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Sierra Boatworks on the north shore of Lake Tahoe, California has been around for decades restoring classics. Once(years ago) saw a rotting GarWood out front 32' to 36'
    with a huge Allison, I believe, V-12 in it, half the siding gone. I asked if it was salvagable and he said No we just measure it, get all the angles and make a new lumber list. Maybe find enough old lumber to use to call it a total restoration. Otherwise, it is just a brand new boat. That is what your pictures show me needs to be done. A totally new boat using the old hull as a plan.
     

  14. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'll suggest the boat doesn't look too bad, from the limited angles and views of the supplied photos, unless you've never done this sort of thing. In which case it's a marriage breaking, second mortgage, gut busting *******, just waiting for someone to "try her on".

    I've restored many boats over the years, taken my share of "baths" and resurrected a few that were too far gone too. Now that I have the tools, skill sets, well equipped shop and experience, I can easily take on a challenge like the boat above. I'd replace, rather then rejuvenate, which clearly has been the theme of other posters here, as this is the most economical process.

    Since Partgypsy hasn't returned to this thread, possably he's gotten the point, or maybe he's finally gotten aboard her and found the "usual suspects" staring back at him.
     
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