Worst Yacht Design Ever?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by intrepid71, May 15, 2016.

  1. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    They also have zip lines.

    Why this design have no zip line?

    It's got zip potential! *bada*boom*kisk*

    Edit: hey, you could run a water slide down those struts! One for wanted guests and the other under a dining table trap door leading to the open ocean ... you know, for that Bond-villain in us all. :)
     
  2. intrepid71
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    intrepid71 Junior Member

    Water slides contain a relatively small volume of water. The significant volume of water and the associated weight is down low, at the pool at the end of the slide.

    As I had mentioned before, a relatively small pool, say 10'x20'x5', contains 62400 lbs of water. If the average person weigh 180 lbs, that is equal to 347 people. How would you feel about the safety of cramming 347 people in that upper deck of that proposed yacht? I don't mean from a crowding standpoint, I mean from a weight standpoint.

    Swimming pools are very heavy, putting one up on a 135 ft tower on a small ship is foolish.
     
  3. intrepid71
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    intrepid71 Junior Member

    I think the move is that you attract a wealthy customer and then talk them into building something feasible. As the previous poster mentioned, this is clickbait. 3-D renderings with no underlying engineering that attract attention because they are are different and outrageous. You are not going to attract anyone who is serious about yachts or has a clue about engineering with that design. The designer did manage to get his name all over the internet and from that standpoint the design has worked far better than he could have hoped.
     
  4. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    The problems arise when a designer truly believes that his ideas are feasible - against all odds, laws of mechanics and common sense. I have seen it happen, and the last time it happened was about two months ago.

    A design team from a reputable international shipyard has prepared a novel superyacht design and was in the final negotiation phase with a client. They have promised him a very particular kind of stern marina, of which they only had a very general idea and a list of features and functions they wanted to see implemented.

    So they asked our company to develop (or, better said - to invent) the engineering part of the design and make an economic offer. We are specialized in mechanical outfitting of ships, by the way.

    After a careful review of their idea, we have realized that it can be done from a technological point of view, but have also foreseen that it would be a mechanical nightmare with a very restricted range of conditions in which it can be operated, and a quite long list of possible failure modes. It was a very compact and dense piece of hardware, full of hydraulic actuators, mechanisms, sensors, piping and wiring. something one would expect to see on-board an offshore exploration and drilling vessel, not on-board a superyacht.

    "Are you positively sure you intend to proceed that way?" - we asked.
    "We have already shown the idea to the client, so we have no other choice but to give it to him." - was their disarming reply.

    The projected costs of that stern marina were impressive, and I really believe that this fact has saved these designer's heads. The client has probably passed out and changed his mind after seeing the price - which in this case was, paradoxically, the most desired and fortunate outcome for the shipyard (and probably for us too :D).
     
  5. Jamie Kennedy
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    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Any yacht smaller than mine is less fortunate.
    Any yacht bigger than mine, less refined. ;-)

    [​IMG]
     
  6. John Perry
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    John Perry Senior Member

    Yes, I know what you mean! But I think it is all down to the control system, if the control system is 'good' enough then in principle it should be possible to minimise accelerations of the elevated mass so also minimising the fluctuating moments that need to be transferred to the supporting vessel.

    A beginner standing on a narrow SUP may wobble with increasing amplitude until they fall off, someone more used to it can balance without significantly wobbling either their body or the board. These days an electronic control system can probably do better at this kind of task than any human. If you search U tube for 'balancing robot' you see many examples of inexpensively constructed devices that balance on a pair of wheels - some do work better than others. These devices mostly use small displacements at ground level to balance an elevated mass but I would have thought it might also feasible to balance an elevated mass by applying small moments at ground level, even if the ground is actually a boat that may be rolling in a sea swell. Of course it would be far more difficult and far more expensive to make such an arrangement work at large scale than with a table top toy and mechanical failure could be disastrous, but then we are talking about superyachts.
     
  7. Joakem
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    Joakem Junior Member

    Hah,
    Love the technical discussion.
    Many vids on youtube of cruise ship pools splashing on a rolling ship.
    Designer should have made the pool wider, to use it as a Flume tank like stabilizer.
    Anyway... its a YACHT!.....................stationary in port 99% of the time.
     
  8. daiquiri
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Not necessarily so. Quite often they are moored some 400-500m from the shore, because not every port have available space and water depth for superyachts. So they are exposed to wave action.
    Another recent trend is called yacht chartering, which keeps these yachts navigating for most of the year. It is a trend which currently grows at an average yearly rate of 6-7%, hence has to be taken into account even in the design phase.
     
  9. Deering
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    Deering Senior Member

    What's with the clear thing at the bow near the waterline? Window? Or some kind of hull gap? In either event, strange. About the last place you'd want a view port. Kind of like a big "Kick me" sign.
     
  10. intrepid71
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    intrepid71 Junior Member

  11. nzboy
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    nzboy Senior Member

    This designs stability no worse than this

    1463963753791.jpg
     
  12. TheChillPrince
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    TheChillPrince Junior Member

  13. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Rurudyne Senior Member


  14. JSL
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    JSL Senior Member

    Since I first saw this creature it looked familiar but I could not place it. Now I know: it is like a giant shoe stretcher.
     
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