World's Largest Cargo Ship

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by brian eiland, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Get a load of this ship! 15,000 containers and a 207' beam!

    And look at the crew size (13) for a ship longer than US aircraft
    carriers, which have complements of 5,000 men and officers.

    Think it's big enough? Notice that 207' beam means it was NOT designed
    for the Panama or Suez canal. It is strictly transpacific.

    Check out the "cruise speed." 31 mph means the goods arrive four
    days before the typical container ship traveling at 18 to 20 mph
    on a China-to-California run. So this behemoth is hugely
    competitive when carrying perishable goods.

    This ship was built in three, perhaps as many as five sections. The sections
    floated together and then welded. It is named Emma Maersk. The
    command bridge is higher than a ten story building and has eleven
    rigs that can operate simultaneously.


    Additional info:
    Country of origin - Denmark
    Length - 1,302 ft
    Width - 207 ft
    Net cargo - 123,200 tons
    Engine - 14 in-line cylinders diesel engine (110,000 BHP)-
    Cruise Speed - 31 mi/h
    Cargo capacity - 15,000 TEU (1 TEU = 20 ft 3" container)
    Crew - 13 people
    First Trip - Sept. 08, 2006 -
    Construction cost - US $145,000,000+

    The silicone paint applied to the ship's bottom reduces water
    resistance and saves 317,000 gallons of diesel per year
     

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  2. Wayne Grabow
    Joined: Aug 2003
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    Location: Colorado

    Wayne Grabow Senior Member

    Very neat! Thanks for posting. It is big but still looks like a very efficient hull, not some floating box.
     
  3. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    Absolutely daunting. :eek:

    Pericles
     
  4. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

  5. kach22i
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Michigan

    kach22i Architect

    I've seen pictures of that engine before - did not know what it went into.

    As far as the paint, maybe they are comparing it to copper based paints or no paint at all?
     
  6. Bergalia
    Joined: Aug 2005
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    Location: NSW Australia

    Bergalia Senior Member

    Bugger....Back to the drawingboard......:(
     
  7. kenJ
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: Williamsburg, VA

    kenJ Senior Member

    We had a presentation recently by MAERSK, if I remember correctly he said it was a single screw. He didn't think they would build anything bigger until engine technologly changes, currently there aren't any engines out there powerfull enough to power anything larger.
     
  8. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

  9. timgoz
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: SW PA USA

    timgoz Senior Member

    Wonder they could keep the cost down so low, comparativly speaking.

    Tim
     
  10. charmc
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: FL, USA

    charmc Senior Member

    The article about "exporting waste to China" is a highly opinionated editorial with many internal contradictions. The writer is describing the recycling of plastics, generally recognized as a beneficial practice. The resulting pollution he (or she; I confess I don't recognize the gender of Chinese names) describes is a product of the methods used by the recycling plant in China. It's a bit strange that the author blames the UK shippers of the plastic waste for the pollution by the Chinese recycler.

    Anyway, the new class of Maersk container ships are amazing. Emma Maersk is only the first of at least five in service so far, and other lines are ordering equally large ships. The economics make sense: same size crew for larger revenue per voyage, and longer waterline length enabling greater hull speed.

    The modular construction method gave one unique advantage: when welding caused a fire that severely damaged the superstructure, the builder cut it off and replaced it with the already completed superstructure module for one of the other ships. The delay in completion was only a week or 2.
     
  11. eponodyne
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    eponodyne Senior Member

    In re the China thing: They ship us crap, we ship them their crap right back. Works for me.

    I do like how the ship is in proportion to itself; from a distance, it'd be hard to tell if it were 450' or three times that long. Also note a return to the 6:1 beam/length ratio favored by the builders of the clipper ships.
     
  12. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Both the ship and the engine give new meaning to the belief that "bigger is better".
     
  13. RHP
    Joined: Nov 2005
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    Location: Singapore

    RHP Senior Member

    Vast but also too big to enter into many of the worlds ports such as the biggest port in South America, Santos due draft! She´s strickly a hub to hub transporter.
     
  14. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    Charmc,

    "The article about "exporting waste to China" is a highly opinionated editorial with many internal contradictions. The writer is describing the recycling of plastics, generally recognized as a beneficial practice. The resulting pollution he (or she; I confess I don't recognize the gender of Chinese names) describes is a product of the methods used by the recycling plant in China. It's a bit strange that the author blames the UK shippers of the plastic waste for the pollution by the Chinese recycler."

    Agreed! However, the writer decided NOT to let the truth get in the way of an irate tirade. :D :D :D :D

    Coincidently, another forum gave a link to marine diesels. http://www.marinediesels.info/index.html

    Regards,

    Pericles
     

  15. Bergalia
    Joined: Aug 2005
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    Location: NSW Australia

    Bergalia Senior Member


    No, I don't think I wrote that one Pericles....:)
     
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