Wooden sailing boat - 100% made in Cambodia

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by kandara, Jun 12, 2007.

  1. kandara
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Cambodia

    kandara New Member

    Hi Folks,

    We have built a unique wooden sailing boat in Cambodia, please visit :

    http://www.romduol.info

    You will find more than 200 detailed pictures, press reviews etc

    Cheers!
    Kandara
     
  2. hansp77
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 690
    Likes: 34, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 200
    Location: Melbourne Australia

    hansp77

    Welcome Kandara,

    thats quite a build, a little rough around the edges if you don't mind me saying (no offence intended), but it will certainly get the job done.

    What is the story behind this?
    Are you from Cambodia? living there? Working there?
    Is it simply a pleasure boat, or what planning to do in it?
    What timber(s) is it built from, and what did you fasten her with?
    I noticed you what appears recycled Sails, and wondering if this was done on a reasonably tight budget, and if so (if you don't mind) what cost you pulled it off for, and in what time frame?
    (I ask all these questions because one day in the not too-distant future I could possibly be working in the region, Cambodia, Laos, etc, and if so would be looking to build a nice little day sailer or river boat)

    anyway, nice job and thanks for sharing,
    Welcome to the forum.

    Hans.
     
  3. kandara
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 4
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    Location: Cambodia

    kandara New Member

    Hello & thanks very much for you interest Hans, and for your welcome message,

    I was living in Cambodia last year but i am now back in France. i'll go again in 2008.

    I wanted to build a sailing boat in Cambodia (Sihanoukville) avoiding as much as possible the direct importation of foreign equipments and skills. The purpose is to reintroduce fishing with sailing boat. The economic model is viable since gas is becoming less and less affordable for the fishermen community. The boat "Romduol" is now operated by a fishermen and has replaced his classical motorized boat.

    The timber used is the "Koki" (commercial name : Merawan - Hopea)

    The sails are recycled from the genoa of a 14m a sailing boat which was doing drug trafficking and got seized by the local authorities.

    The total price (all inclusive) is US$4000. Dimensions (5.5m - 1.90m).
    We have built it in 9 months. But now that we have the experience we can do it in less than 4 months.

    We are now planning to build a second one, bigger : 7m !

    Sincerely,
    Kandara
     
  4. hansp77
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 690
    Likes: 34, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 200
    Location: Melbourne Australia

    hansp77

    Thanks Kandara,

    Its all making a bit more sense now, its a woriking fishing boat! The roughness around the edges fits perfectly.

    Was that drug running yacht that big one one beached up on its side with no mast? My recycling scavenger eyes, and 'masochistic project boat nature' noticed that one.

    Are you doing this through some sort of development program, or through your own initiative?

    It sounds like a great project, and good cause.
    What is the status of Koki at the moment in Cambodia? I see a couple of sites say to avoid using Merawan, yet others say that there are some sustainable sources avaiable for it.
    I would be intersted to know more details about your project, as development studies and issues (particularly sustainability stuff like this) is what I have just finished studying and will begin working in soon. It is also in one of my favourite parts of the world, where I aim to do some work. The overlap with boats, makes it even better.
    PM me any more details if you want,

    Thanks Hans.
     
  5. kandara
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 4
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    Location: Cambodia

    kandara New Member

    My pleasure Hans!

    I am happy that you are interested in the project,

    Yes you are right! the big white boat on the picture is the one we are talking about. It has been looted and the remaining sail was used as a roof somewhere in the suburbs of the town.

    It is a personal project but i am currently setting up a NGO to support and develop our initiatives. I'll keep you updated.

    About the Merawan timber, we are not proud of what we are favoring by doing so : the logging disaster in Cambodia. I have never seen any significant sustainability plan in forest management in SE Asia.

    Let's PM each other. I have few documents, but most of them are in French unfortunately.

    Sincerely,
    Kandara
     
  6. Dave-Fethiye
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 37
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 22
    Location: Turkey

    Dave-Fethiye Junior Member

    Hi,
    I took a look at your photos and found them very interesting.

    the style of build seems quite similar to the boat I recently bought and am restoring. I shall try and upload a photo of the inside.

    A couple of questions.
    Are the frames cut, rather than bent ? It looks like it - thats the same as mine I think.

    Secondly and of real help to me if you dont mind - The stuff that is being used for caulking - is it cotton ? It looks a bit to uniform - what is it. Had has is been soaked in a preserver ? Is that red lead ? Or something else.

    Thanks for any explanation because I am about to replace some timbers and will have to caulk ( with cotton) myself.

    All the best
    Dave.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. kandara
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Cambodia

    kandara New Member

    Hi Dave,

    Yes the frames are cut (not bent),

    The stuff used for caulking is nylon, it has the advantage of being rustproof and has been soaked in a preserver (powder). It is supposed to last up to 3 years. But some other boats were using regular cotton (less expensive).

    I have also used Sikaflex 290DC with Sika Primer 290 to finish the caulking.

    I hope it answers some of your questions, please feel free to ask if you need more details.

    Regards,
    Kandara
     
  8. Dave-Fethiye
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 37
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    Location: Turkey

    Dave-Fethiye Junior Member

    Thats nice that you are online !

    Is the nylon specially for caulking or is it nylon rope ?
    Maybe I should use it - but I dont know if it is available here (Turkey)
     
  9. Dave-Fethiye
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 37
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 22
    Location: Turkey

    Dave-Fethiye Junior Member

    There seems to be three stages to the caulking.

    1) The nylon "soaked" in powder ( it still looks like a liquid to me :) because it has left orange stains around the wood on either side of the join)

    2) A dark material being spread in with a scraper - whats that ?
    ( is it the with Sika Primer 290 ? )

    3) Some goo ( is that Sikaflex 290DC ) going in with a gun.

    Is that about it ?

    Thanks for your help.
     

  10. Scott Carter
    Joined: Oct 2006
    Posts: 130
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    Location: Annapolis

    Scott Carter Senior Member

    Hi Guys,
    Chiming in from Thailand here. The traditional method of caulking here (50 years or so now) is based on cotton cordage which has been wiped with red lead preservative and driven into seams that have been pre-widened with a chisel (sometimes actually removing wood fibers, sometimes just compressing them, depending on the original seam width). Once driven into the seam, the whole affair is smeared with a resin compound (100% natural and lasts about 2 to 4 years) of indigenous "tree oils" and a powder of reportedly ground up crystallized "tree sap".
    I recommend ANY Sika product over ANY of these recipes, if you can afford it and if it's available where you are.
    Scott
     
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