Wooden rub rail inquiry

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by terry32506, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. terry32506
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    terry32506 Junior Member

    Hello all , I have a link to show a photo of a pram boat showing the style of wooden rub rail that I like..Is there a particular style name for this type of rub rail and are there specific plans to make this type? I am building a small boat and I would like to make rub rails like this or better yet if you can buy them pre fabricated that would be easier...I think they look quite attractive having the slots..I would appreciate any tips or info links that you may have on this very much.

    Here is the link to the photo of the boat

    http://dashpointpirate.typepad.com/the_dash_point_pirate_woo/images/2007/05/12/littleboats4.jpg


    Thank you,

    regards,

    Terry
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    They aren't commonly pre-made, but rather built up during the construction of the boat.

    What you're describing as slots, isn't part of the rub rail. The rub rail is only the wooden ellement on the outside of the hull. This is generally a sacrificial strip of hardwood, that takes the abuses of docking and handling. When it's dinged up good, it's replaced with a new piece of hardwood.

    The slots your refer to in this case are just spacers, mounted on the inside of the planking, which serve to position another structural element (sheer clamp) further inboard.

    By looking carefully at similar arrangements on other boats you can see how they're made and it's not especially difficult to muster. The ends of the clamp typically fall into knees, which help tie the sides of the boat to the ends.
     
  3. terry32506
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    terry32506 Junior Member

    Hi Par , thanks for your detailed explaination. I will browse and look at more designs like that and sure to do something similar.



    Terry
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Generally, it's best to adhere to the plans. These are structural elements and you should have a fair understanding of the forces involved, before making changes. What are you building and why do you want to change it?
     
  5. terry32506
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    terry32506 Junior Member

    Hi again Par, the plans are based on an 8' pram boat that I have attached. I just wanted to beef up the rub rails and maybe make it go all around the boat..Was thinking of taking a 1/2 by 2 out of mahogany and dado it so that it sits flush with the panel. I seen that on some other boats and looked quite good and neat. Also might want to consider putting in a small front seat and one in the back..The plan says if seats are to be put in to make it the same as the center seat but that doesnt seem to make sense..The battens wouldnt go in right at the front especially but what am I to say really , this is my first build. I will be using bronze or solid brass oar lock sockets..In other words I dont want something that looks cheap and is built cheaply..I am using tropical marine ply, excellent stuff..I will epoxy saturate the panels before stitching them up...Right now I have just cut the panels and have to wait on the epoxy until I can do something in my shop to keep it heated...Its one of those outdoor 12 x 20 tent style shops but not insulated. I have a section quarantined with a tarp but dont think I can maintain the temp overnight type of thing...I am up in Canada and its below freezing..If I can keep it around 70 that would be ideal..My dad and I were going to try an oil filled heater but dont think thats going to cut it. Any ideas on that as well?
     

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  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've used those oil filled heaters in freezing weather, but my freezing weather is considerably different then yours. Cover the part to cure with a tarp, sealing it to the ground with the heater under the tarp. It will get warm in there and stay that way if it's not that big an area.

    You have a nice, light, easily built dinghy. The addition of fore and aft seats and three times the lumber in "beefed" up rails, will just add weight, complexity and diminish it's capacity.

    The rails as designed appear to be fairly stout. If you want more protection, then attach hollow or solid back half ovals to the rail. These will fend off a lot of abuse, especially the solid back versions. They have plastic and rubber rails too, but these are pretty nasty looking.

    As I mentioned, rails are sacrificial and intended to be replaced from time to time. You could make a cap of sorts to protect the rail, removing and replacing as necessary, though this has the "air filter for an air filter" feel to it.

    You could make seat boxes fore and aft, but I would do them as the center thwart is done. A cleat on the transom and a vertical frame on the "free" edge. They look to be simply plywood with a 1x2 edge to trim it off and add support. This is light, easy, offers very good ventilation and looks more "yachty" then some taped seam boxes.

    The best thing with these boats is think light weight and easy.
     
  7. terry32506
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    terry32506 Junior Member

    Thanks Par , excellent knowledge you have. Im not quite clear on what you mean about using half oval unless your meaning to place those on the top of the panel which would cover the ply and protect it from being damaged?...I noticed that in the plan boat the rail is not covering the top of the ply therfor I would think more of a chance of it being damaged..Anyways I wanted to show you this other photo...I think it looks good because it covers the top of the ply. I would think that look would be un appealing having those plys showing, or you think otherwise? As for the weight yes the weight factor I want to keep down..I thought instead of using say 3/4'' as shown in the plan photo perhaps I could use half inch and put that groove like shown in this second photo..It would give the sides a bit more height, give it that smooth look and might even be a tad lighter then a solid 3/4'' piece. As for the cleat on the transom and a vertical frame on the free edge that all has me lost...How can you tell im learning :)

    I also like the idea you have on the tarp...Its basically just hanging with some 2 x 2's to hold it down but will definitely reduce the area and just have it enough to cover the boat...I have a sheet of plywood on two horses in the quarantined area as a working platform and thinking I could keep the oil heater under the plywood and seal off around it or would it be better that I take out the sheet of plywood and just set the boat on the two horses and seal like that?
     

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  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    General, I try to keep the heater from touching the tarp or boat near the heater. You're rub rail looks fine and protecting the plywood end grain is a wise idea. I don't know why the plans don't do this, which suggests the designer isn't very experienced. Who's plans are they?

    Half oval stock is available in most marine stores. (http://www.go2marine.com/category.do?no=17817&view=item&mfrno=382) this is what is might look like, often pre-drilled and counter sunk. It's available in stainless, bronze and brass. If you're going in salt water, forget about the brass.

    These metal strips are attached to the rail and offer far better wear and abrasion protection. They also make them in aluminum and plastic, but usually are specifically shaped to fit production boats.

    As for the seats in the ends of the boat, first it's not a good place for seats in a boat this small. It is a good place for storage and built in floatation, but you really don't want people sitting there. Boats this small, really want people sitting in the middle, where their weight will not upset things.

    A buoyancy compartment in the ends of the boat is a good idea and needn't be especially fancy. A simple 1/4" plywood box will do with a deck access plate [​IMG] so you can clean it out and let air inside when not in use.
     

  9. terry32506
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    terry32506 Junior Member

    Thanks again for all the info Par...The plans I got from eBay..I am an eBay seller and so I did some browsing and come across this plan..All I know is his first name is Tim..I think your right that he doesnt have a lot of experience but what caught my eye was the style of this boat..I paid only $10 for the plans which includes many photos of the procedures and a simplified step by step process..Why I am doing this project is to expand my already small home based woodworking business I have now..I do things like custom fly fishing boxes, essential oil storage boxes , tackle boxes or what have you as well I offer a laser engraving service..In my area there are many fly fisherman and I know that this type of boat will suit them just right and already have a couple of guys lined up wanting one and are quite eager to see the finished product.. As for the extra seating the more I think about it the more I am leaning to leaving them out all together...I use to have a boat similar to this ( 7 1/2 foot, no flotation but felt very secure in it.. Anyways the 7 1/2 footer had a small bench across the back to serve as a place for your tackle box , or what have you and had a small hole cut in the center back to allow the electric motor cables to pass through and the battery would tuck under the bench..I liked that and think I will do something on those lines with this boat to give the operator the option of using a small electric motor. Also some other things to think about such as a place to mount anchor pully systems on the front and or back, as well rod holders which would be an added asset I believe. I have fly fished for over 25 years and know that without the anchors you may as well fish on the shore. Im sure as I get into this I will have all sorts of little ideas flowing.
     
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