Wooden dory/skiff

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by exmoore, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. exmoore
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: Virginia

    exmoore New Member

    Picked up a wooden boat (covered with fiberglass on outside) that was built here in Virginia Beach in the '60s. It is about 18 feet long, narrow, good shape - wood is solid. Need some fiberglass work. Stern is angled sharply - for laying out nets I am told. Anyhow, it has a hole in the deck where an outboard motor used to be - through the hull. I am told outboard motors were placed through the hull so nets could be layed out without the motor being in the way. I had intended to cover the hole and have a bracket built to hang a motor off the transom, but I think I want to keep it original. I am trying to find information as to how to build a bracket/box to hang a motor through the hull. One of my issues is that I don't know what that configuration is called so everything I Google is not what I am looking for. Any information or links to any information regarding this type of set up would be greatly appreciated.

    Erik[​IMG]
     
  2. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Hi Erik,

    Welcome to the forum . . :)

    Google: - And also try Google Images:

    outboard well - - | - - outboard motor well

    outboard well plans - - | - - outboard motor well plans

    outboard well construction - - | - - outboard motor well construction

    outboard well design - - | - - outboard motor well design

    outboard well dory - - | - - outboard motor well dory

    outboard well skiff- - | - - outboard motor well skiff​

    Good luck !
     
  3. exmoore
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    exmoore New Member

    Thanks!
     
  4. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    -
    Your outboard hole is near the transom, so if you want the motor to be able to tilt you could close the fore end of the hole and move the hole a bit aft so you could build the well like it is on the Simmons Sea Skiff, see this ad and below...

    The same outboard well construction can be seen below on the Seaman Sarah Ann and the like...

     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    This is called a well mounted outboard installation and it's more common than you might realize. The examples shown above are one approuch. Another approuch is to have the engine mounted a little (or a lot, as in some fishing skiffs) farther forward. In both cases, the engine is bolted to a false transom inside the boat and a box is placed around it, to prevent the water from climbing aboard your boat. Often a lid is used to keep noise down.

    In low power applications the transom can just stand up with some minor bracing (knees, etc.), but once the outboard size gets over say about 15 HP, you'll likely need some athwart bracing, to prevent wracking. The box does need to be well thought out, to prevent leaks and provide sufficient stiffness. Transom heights, aperture size and location, ventilation, etc. all are things to work through as you develop the design.

    Post some photos of the boat, so we can see what you're working with.
     
  6. exmoore
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    exmoore New Member

    Thanks for the suggestions and info Now that I know what it is called, it is easy to find information. I may have to rethink what I am planning to do.
    Erik
     
  7. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    -
    Hi Erik,

    See PAR's website for suggestions and info how to put it together:

    - ---> Epoxy Tips & Tricks ---> Liquid Joinery ---> Structural Fillet Anatomy ---> Fillet Types ---> Click the Pics

    Go for the Heavy Structural Fillet type there for putting the box together and to join it to the boat . . :cool:

    Best ask PAR for advice how to do the right angled outside corners of the box . . :idea: - (as I don't see a suggestion for this on the linked pages)

    Good luck !
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2016
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Outside corners are simply rounded over sufficient enough radius to permit the fabric or tape to lay down neatly. A 1/4" (6mm) radius can work, but will prove problematic. I consider a 3/8" (10mm) radius a minimum round over for fabric to lay down without puckers and the like. The 3/8" radius also is easier to make look nice too.

    In the end, your repair approuch needs to take the boat's original construction into consideration. If it's as you've described (solid wood, not plywood) you will likely not use much epoxy, compaired to fasteners.

    [​IMG]

    Angélique, this image is on my site and does show an outside corner treatment. An ideal fillet should have at least the material thickness in goo, at it's deepest portion. The 3:1 rule I use generally insures this will occur, depending on how obtuse the joint becomes.
     

  9. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Thanks for the reply PAR [​IMG]
    P.S. - Erik, the post #1 picture is gone :confused: - Could you repost it please :?:
     
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