Wooden beach cat

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by mrthethird, Sep 15, 2005.

  1. mrthethird
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    mrthethird Junior Member

    I am new to forums of any kind, so bear with me please. I have started redesign/construction of a 15' beach-type catamaran from free plans I found on the web. I have built kayaks and canoes, both strip and stitch and glue previously, but I am new to sailboats.

    The plans are for a "Hobby Kat", from 1973 Mechanix Illustrated. They are not a good set of instructions for building, but I think I can fill in the blanks. I am also scaling it up from 14' 5" to 15' 6".

    What I need input on is the spars and rigging. I would much prefer to build the mast (20') myself, but I am somewhat limited in knowledge on how exactly the sail and mast connect and interact with each other. Also, if I build the mast, where do I find a swivel mast step that will work with it?

    thanks for any input you can provide
     
  2. rturbett
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    rturbett Senior Member

    I would suggest looking at a hobie catalog just to get a few ideas on how the mast and step interact.
    All the cats I've sailed have a slot on the rear of the mast that the sail slides up. The "bead" on the leading edge of the sail fits in the slot and keeps the sail attached to the mast.
     
  3. Carlito's
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    Carlito's Chalana 24

    Buy a hobie 16 used mast. You can find a good one for $200.00 dollars. They are very light weight and has all you need.
     
  4. rturbett
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    rturbett Senior Member

    I agree with the H16 mast, but the mast base on a 16 is not easily adapted to home contruction.
    I would consider buying an old hobie- ones with soft hulls are easy to find cheap- and scavange all the hardware on it.
     
  5. Carlito's
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    Carlito's Chalana 24

    This might be the easy way. You only have to build the hulls that fits the frame. It is cheaper and fun.
     
  6. mrthethird
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    mrthethird Junior Member

    Thanks for the idea. I think I'll look for the used mast. I've already used the "buy an old one for parts" idea too many times for a healthy marriage...
    I'll hold on the wood mast until I figure it out.

    Thanks again.
     
  7. mrthethird
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    mrthethird Junior Member

    Hobby Kat

    :rolleyes: btw, has ANYONE built this boat, or seen one completed? After looking at the plans, it would be somewhat reassuring to know that at least one has been completed successfully from scratch....
     

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  8. Carlito's
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    Carlito's Chalana 24

    Hi

    Looking again into your question, if you mean how to attach the sail to the wooden mast. There are small T tracks to attach to the mast and external slides bolts attached to the sail with shackles. There you got a good way and price-effective for what you get. A more expensive way its use harken batten car system but that may cost you twice the price for a entire H16 in good condition so i think thats not what you are looking for.

    The T-track is made from a stainless steel plate bended to form like wings (T) were the external slide attach. It is not the traditional T track it is more cheaper and weak. You can fabric your own T-track with one plate of 1 inch wide 1/16 tall and long as the mast "20 feets" and other plate 1/2 inch wide by 1/8 tall by 20 feets. You attach it to the mast with screws and the 1/2 inch plate between the mast an the wider plate living 1/4 inch space on both sides were the external slides on main could attach. Study it it could become a fun project.
     
  9. byankee
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    byankee Junior Member

    proven beach cat plan

    I don't know how far along you are, but if you're still in the preliminary stages you might want to change plans for proven design - or at least one that has been reviewed and approved by folks who know boats. See the 16.5 ' Quattro cat plan at WoodenBoat's web site http://www.woodenboatstore.com/prodinfo.asp?number=400-125
     
  10. rturbett
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    rturbett Senior Member

    my personal favorite-

    If your going to look at other designs, look here!http://www.sharkcatamaranclass.org/WHAT.HTML
    I cant say enough about the excellent qualities of Shark catamarans- with excellent support and advice from Shark fleet #1.
    Fiberglass or wood. :cool:

    Rob
     
  11. mrthethird
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    mrthethird Junior Member

    Quattro 16

    I've started looking at other designs, the Quattro is a nice option, and it appears that it coud be strip-built. I'm also researching the old hobie idea a little more in depth, as disposing of old hulls may not be as difficult as I had thought at first. Plus, it comes with a trailer... :p
     

  12. rturbett
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    rturbett Senior Member

    I am sorry to admit that the Hobie is the quickest way to get on the water- In fact it is probably the least expensive too. A hobie with soft hulls and trailer can be obtained for "very little" money. These hulls are easily repaired. (I've done a number of them) The boat just wouldn't be as competitive as a pure Hobie sailor would like.

    There is even a greater sense of pride and accomplishment from scratch building. The dollar signs come with it.
    Rob
     
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