Wood Preservative, Copper Naphthenate

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by randy@poles.com, Sep 23, 2015.

  1. randy@poles.com
    Joined: Sep 2015
    Posts: 1
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    Location: Colorado

    randy@poles.com New Member

    I'm new to your site.
    I get calls from wooden boat owners that purchase 2% Copper Naphthenate wood preservative from us. They usually use it on hull restorations. It has an odor, and you don't want to get it in the water. Copper Naphthenate has been used for close to 100 years as a boat wood preservative. Has anyone used this preservative lately? Do you have questions for me?
     
  2. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    I have used it way back in time. I was unaware that you can still buy copper naphthenate what with EP regulations and all.

    There are different ways to preserve boat wood these days, epoxy saturation for example.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Why would we have questions for a poster after his one and only thread, which offered nothing new in it?
     
  4. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    I have used it on outdoor wood projects like decks and stairs around my house. it is sold in small quantities for use as an "end cut" solution where you cut pressure treated lumber. I have also applied it to landscaping timbers to try and make them last a bit longer. Not sure if that worked, eventually even the treated lumber breaks down when in contact with the wet ground.
     
  5. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    what is the odor from and can it be eliminated?
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 476, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Carboxylic acids are the big culprit and nope, not even a full up respirator can get rid of the smell completely.
     

  7. Lepke
    Joined: Sep 2015
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    Location: Oregon to Alaska

    Lepke Junior Member

    Before the EPA we had good wood preservers. Cuprinol back then was widely used. Treated wood didn't rot or get soft. The current Cuprinol is different. There was another preservative made in the boatyards that consisted of some form of copper and arsenic. It was water based and in 2 parts. It worked best with damp wood. I don't remember the formula. Wish I did.
    Now with the EPA we have to cut down more trees to replace rotted wood that could still be good. Commercial operaters are scraping good diesels and the diesel fuel we get is crap. It doesn't burn well, causes diesel stoves to soot up and I have to add a catalyst to diesel in the winter so my truck will start.
     
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