Wood for boat

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Dragon Feorge, May 8, 2019.

  1. Dragon Feorge
    Joined: Apr 2019
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Maplecrest, NY

    Dragon Feorge Junior Member

    Ok, here I go again. I have decided on a boat to build. Originally I was leaning towards a jonboat. I have decided to build a skiff, a 14 ft, flat bottom boat utilizing plank construction, called "White Duck". I am having difficulty finding the necessary boards in the length required.
    The plans call for using 14 ft planks in 1x12x14 and 1x4x14 for the sides. The boards for the bottom are no problem, it is cross planked.
    Is it possible to join 2 boards together end to end and how is it done.
    I should add that I am planning to fiberglass the bottom and sides.
    I could substitute 3/4" plywood for the sides and scarf or use butt joints on the plywood. Is it possible to scarf 2 boards together? I will also need 14 ft boards for the chines, keel, runners,seat risers, and gunwale.
     
  2. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,220
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Yes, you can scarf boards together just as you can scarf plywood. But why use solid wood? Just build the whole boat out of plywood. Scarf two sheets of 4 x 8 plywood and you'll have the 14 feet you need for the sides. Use plywood on the bottom as well, and eliminate all those seams.
     
  3. Dragon Feorge
    Joined: Apr 2019
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Maplecrest, NY

    Dragon Feorge Junior Member

    If I use plywood for the keel and runners do you think they will hold up if I fiberglass them. I live in the Catskills, upstate NY. Most of the lakes up here have a lot of rocks in them and the shores can be Rocky too...
     
  4. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,220
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    On the several small boats I built I used oak for the keel and runners, and put an aluminum strip along the bottom of the keel. It seems to help. Here in the Pacific Northwest all the beaches are very rocky.
     
  5. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
    Posts: 655
    Likes: 74, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Senior Member

    The plans he has are probably for planks. There are some differences in ply vs. solid wood. The edges will tend to delaminate over time. I would not say you can just rip plywood into planks as a substitution, which I how I read the OP's question here.

    If you can't source the materials called for in your plans, get different plans. Esp. if you don't have much boat building experience.
     
  6. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,220
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    I wasn't suggesting he cut the plywood into planks. That would be counterproductive.
     
  7. Dragon Feorge
    Joined: Apr 2019
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Maplecrest, NY

    Dragon Feorge Junior Member

    If I went with the plywood, I would need minimum of 4 sheets of okoume. Plans call for 3/4" planks. The plans also state that if desired, it can be built using 3/8"marine plywood for a lighter boat for car topping. I have a 1955 MasterCraft boat trailer that was my father's, so that is what I will be using to transport the boat.
    That being said, yesterday I found a local supplier that has the planks in the thickness, width and length I need in premium grade. Now it is white pine, a wood the plans do list. And I will be fiberglassing the bottom and sides, also the inside seams.
    I understood what IKE
    meant about scarfing the plywood.
     

  8. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
    Posts: 655
    Likes: 74, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Senior Member

    I think the OP was. It would be the quickest, cheapest way of accomplishing the build. Esp. if he were going to slather the whole thing in fiberglass (not recommended BTW). It just would not have very long term durability.
     
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