wondering

Discussion in 'Education' started by manyquestions, Dec 10, 2009.

  1. manyquestions
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Spain

    manyquestions New Member

    At present I’m studying naval engineering and propulsion in Spain. When finished I would like to go into structural design and analysis in Spain, England or wherever. But my real dream is to work with cruise ships although I must admit I haven’t got much idea on there design or build -obviously apart from what I can gather of the internet- due to the fact hat out here they specialise in the study of naval ships, crude carriers, bulk carriers…and so on.

    Could somebody please orientate me in how I could become a big player in Cruise ship design and building or if anybody knows any courses specialising in this area.

    Thanks everybody!
     
  2. JRMacGregor
    Joined: Oct 2005
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    Location: Scotland, UK

    JRMacGregor Junior Member

    Hi Manyquestions

    I dont believe any university courses specialise in cruise ship design

    There is not much special about cruise ship design from a naval architecture or propulsion perspective. The big issue is integrating the ideas of the owner and interior designer into an engineered structure that is safe, economic and will pass regulations. There is a lot of space, access issues to solve. The large, light structures are also interesting.

    If you really want to go for it, I think you have a number of options;

    1) start with a shipyard in Spain building passenger ferries, and then use that experience to transition across to cruise ships

    I don't know if any yards in Spain are still doing ferries. Barreras made some nice ferries I think. But generally its not a good time for European shipbuilding just now.

    The main yards in the world with the cruise ship knowledge are limited. So your options there are;

    2) try to get a job with STX Chantiers de l'Atlantique in Brittany

    3) try to get a job with Fincantieri in Italy (or Marriotti)

    4) try to get a job with Meyer Werft in Germany

    Other options are;

    5) get a job with a major class society (LR or DnV) who does a lot of work on approval of cruise ship designs, in the department which is specialising in that work

    6) work for a company like Deltamarin in Finland who is doing a lot of the design work for the above mentioned major shipyard

    7) try to work for an owner, and get involved with some of their newbuilding projects - Carnival or RCCL etc

    after a while in one of the above, you can transfer across to another side of the industry
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If you work at a firm, they will give you a part of the project. For example, lay the HVAC ductwork, or the third deck pool.
     
  4. welder/fitter
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    Location: Vancouver

    welder/fitter Senior Member

    You could contact the Grand Bahamas Shipyards. They are/were co-owned by two of the larger cruise ship companies.
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Being a big player also involves willing to work ridiculous long hours. You probably be working twice as much as a regular employees, but with unpaid overtime. Also, look at the age of the designers who are big players, and it will give you an idea of how many years they worked hard to get there.
     

  6. manyquestions
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Spain

    manyquestions New Member

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