Winterizing a Diesil

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by WickedGood, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. WickedGood

    WickedGood Guest

    Winterizing a Diesil.

    Yanmar 240
    Closed Antifreeze cooled




    What do you need to do?
     
  2. Lurvio
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Lurvio Mad scientist

    I think more info is needed on the engine setup. What kind of cooling for example.

    L
     
  3. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    sail to the tropics
     
  4. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    A shortlist for recreational diesels, boat out of the water.

    1. Fill up the tank. Avoids condensation and saves you money next year.
    2. Check coolant freezing point, add glycol if necessary.
    3. Take the battery home and keep it charged.
     
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  5. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Gee, youre up in Maine, better make sure that the seawater cooling system is drained and pickled with anti freeze. Filling up tanks is a good idea, I prefer to empty them and put the fuel to good use. If your engine is a big, expensive, powerful unit not a bad idea to have it professionally serviced before storage. Keep an eye on them while its being serviced then you will learn details and common service problems for future DIY servicing.
     
  6. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Wear warm clothes and go boating.. Anyway Maine can't be much colder than May-June in here ;)
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Make sure the raw water system is drained and preferably filled with enviromentally safe antifreeze. There may be a sea water strainer or filter raw water pump, oil cooler, transmission cooler, exhaust manifold/riser, and muffler. If you have an outdrive then depending on the model the water pump may be in it or not.
     
  8. wdbeyer
    Joined: Jun 2010
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    wdbeyer Junior Member

    Change the oil!!!! Very important on a diesel for layup. Fuel filters, primary and secondary also shud be changed.

    run the pink antifreeze through the entire system. Best done with two people, a 5 gal pail filled with the anti-freeze and the raw water pick-up hose stuck in it. Run the engine untill antifreeze runs out the exhaust. (My 6BTA cummins took about 6 gals of antifreeze.) Also drain the raw water strainer and/or fill with antifreeze... I opened the seacock when storing on land.

    Remove the battery and store inside (not on a concrete floor) and trickle charge from time to time.

    A full fuel tank with addidtive is a good idea too.

    In the spring the engine zincs should be replaced before re-commissioning.

    A shop manual is invaluable. Also boatdiesel.com is a good resource.
     
  9. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    For all winter would'nt be a good idea to "fog" the cylinders or inject 2 stroke oil in the cylinders ....keeping the volume low to avoid super high pressures when cranking later.
     
  10. wdbeyer
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    wdbeyer Junior Member

    Easy Rider, I never fogged my diesels (Dee-troits or Cummins). Don't know about the Volvo's, but would assume means pulling the injectors....big hassle. As long as the raw water is out, the closed coolant system is up to snuff, and the oil is changed prior to layup and a good charged battery hooked up in the spring, I've always had them crank right up. An inspection of the raw water impeller is a good idea, either befor winterizing or right before spring commissioning.
     
  11. wdbeyer
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    wdbeyer Junior Member

    I meant Yanmar, not Volvo's.....
     
  12. anthony goodson
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    anthony goodson Senior Member

    You might consider leaving one battery aboard ,to ensure that the auto bilge pump is energised .I have dealt with more than one flooded engine compartment, filled by a combination of heavy rain .and a cover ,moved by the weather, or even curious passers by. The hull/deck flange can leak too, and water falling on the bow can end up right down in the engine compartment, If you have transom drain bungs you have no need to worry.
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Taking out the batteries is an old wive's tale. Batteries in hot weather last much less than in cold climates. As long as it is charged it doesn't harm it to stay in the boat. Nobody takes the battery out of their car every night. The same for not leaving batteries on concrete floors. It makes no difference.
     
  14. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    " I never fogged my diesels (Dee-troits or Cummins). Don't know about the Volvo's, but would assume means pulling the injectors....big hassle."

    Then there may be an advantage to glow plugs ...mine has them and they are easy to pull out.

    Easy Rider
     

  15. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "I never fogged my diesels (Dee-troits or Cummins). Don't know about the Volvo's, but would assume means pulling the injectors....big hassle"

    "Then there may be an advantage to glow plugs ...mine has them and they are easy to pull out."

    Most diesels will be warmed up to change the oil before the last shut down.

    AS the STOP lever bis pulled simply spray fogging oil into the inlet.

    The diesel will actually run on the fogging oil so a good bit can be sprayed in tho it will cause a huge FOG outside .

    Stopping the engine and i cranking while spraying also works.

    When done be sure to seal the Inlet and Outlet as air tight as you can.

    A wet exhaust or lift can should be drained as moisture in the exhaust is not great for cylinder walls.

    Duct tape over aluminum foil woks to keep the breeze from blowing thru the engine , bringing new moisture to condense inside the engine.

    Truck (CAT Cummins ) shops will have an oil additive that "fumes off" to help keep the inside from rusting.

    Old Detroit 2 strokes are the simplest to put to bed.
    The air box covers are removed , fogging oil sprayed in on top of each piston , the engine cranked a revolution or three and the air box cover replaced.

    Almost every engine mfg or converter will have instructions for "out of Service for over 30 days", in their book.

    Following Da Book may save big bucks , but you may have to stand over a boatyard "mechanic" to actually have the procedures followed.

    Or just Do It Yourself.
     
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