windows type of glass on wind shields and coach roof sides

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Dinis Matias, Jan 17, 2017.

  1. Dinis Matias
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: Richmond, BC, Canada

    Dinis Matias New Member

    I am looking for a tread from Eric Stonberg related to windows type of glass on wind shields and coach roof sides.
    Can some one point me on the right direction,please?
    Forgive me for my poor grammar
    Dinis
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are only two types of glass used on boats, tempered and laminated. Windshields and forward facing ports/lights use laminated glass, just like that found in automotive windshields. This is to protect the skipper and crew in the event of a glass break. I personally prefer laminated glass for all the boat's needs, but tempered glass is much stronger and often cheaper, so you see it used a lot. There is a third glass choice, though not seen much and it's a tempered laminated version. It's strong and doesn't shatter into bits.

    On the plastics side of the coin, you have two choices, acrylic (Lucite) and polycarbonate (Lexan). Acrylic is about 15 times as strong as regular glass, while polycarbonate is about 250 times as strong. Both are about half the weight of regular glass. Acrylic is a fair bit clearer than regular glass, while poly is a little less so. Acrylic cuts easier, but both can be cut with the usual choices. Poly has much higher chemical resistance. Poly is also easier to drill or machine than acrylic. These plastics can be bent, poly can be cold bent. Acrylic can be polished, poly can't. Acrylic tolerates UV much better too.

    The thread about this subject is about a year old, if my memory still works, so check out Eric's previous posts (click on his name) and run back about a year.
     
  3. Dinis Matias
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Dinis Matias New Member

    Thank you very much PAR, for taking the time in answering me, I will look into Eric's post, but I think you told me what I need to know.
    Dinis
     
  4. FAST FRED
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    We have US Navy 12 WWII inch glass ports installed.

    3/4 inch plate glass is all thats used.

    Sail Ocean racing rules for sail seem to specify glass thickness by size but not special material.

    For large picture window areas for offshore , storm shutters might be wise.
     
  5. Dinis Matias
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    Location: Richmond, BC, Canada

    Dinis Matias New Member

    Thank you for your input.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Laminated glass wasn't available in WWII and I'm not sure about tempered, so this might be an explanation. Given the big difference in strength and shattering, tempered or laminated is the only real set of choices. Besides, have you priced 3/4" 'glass, when tempered will be over twice as strong, at half the thickness.
     

  7. JSL
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    Location: Delta BC

    JSL Senior Member

    In your area try Diamond Seaglaze and ARC Windows. They can get you the right material.
     
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