windlass

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Wayne Kendall, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. Wayne Kendall
    Joined: Aug 2012
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Newfoundland, Ca

    Wayne Kendall Junior Member

    I have a 36 foot cabin cruiser and want to install a windlass. Wondering what would be an adequate one for the boat size? Will it be able to use a combination of rope and chain? And what size of rope and chain is required.

    Thank You
    Wayne
     
  2. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 109, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Frequently a windlass is taken to have a horizontal drum layout .

    Good with two anchors to chose one set the best for the current bottom.

    Or two sizes , lunch hook and overnight.

    A capstan has a vertical gypsy and drum.

    If docking help is needed the capstan works the best at being able to snug a line from almost any direction , not so easy with a windlass.

    Make sure you chose the USE that suits your cruising style.
     
  3. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    8mm chain would do the trick. 6mm would also work and may be prefered if you need a long chain.

    How much chain depends on your geography , water depth. 5 to one scope is required for all weather anchoring.

    When choosing a windlass pick the fastest model. The motor will last longer and they use less power.

    Horizontal winches like the one pictured are more versatile and easiest to use...vertical winches are high maintenance.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    8mm chain would do the trick. 6mm would also work and may be prefered if you need a long chain.

    How much chain depends on your geography , water depth. 5 to one scope is required for all weather anchoring.

    When choosing a windlass pick the fastest model. The motor will last longer and they use less power.

    Horizontal winches like the one pictured are more versatile and easiest to use...vertical winches are high maintenance.
     
  5. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 3,324
    Likes: 146, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1819
    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    A couple of years ago I installed a Lofrans Project X vertical windlass because it has a very low profile and excellent spring loaded chain feed.

    But one negative aspect is that it has no chain locking device like on a Simpson Lowrance, so all thrust is acting on the gearbox. Although it still works well, I regard this as an unhealthy construction.
     

  6. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 109, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    But one negative aspect is that it has no chain locking device like on a Simpson Lowrance, so all thrust is acting on the gearbox. Although it still works well, I regard this as an unhealthy construction.

    No windlass horizontal or vertical is designed to hold the boat while anchored.

    A chain stopper bolted in the deck , that can easily take the force of the vessel surging back is required.

    http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=51535

    This is an example of a rather weak unit , the better ones are cast bronze and can easily hold the weight of the vessel.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.