Windjammer Build?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Tallboy, Feb 10, 2015.

  1. Tallboy
    Joined: Jan 2015
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    Tallboy Junior Member

    hi all, my first post here :)
    I love tall ships, especially clippers and windjammers. I've always wanted to build one and maybe set up a trust for sail training. (Cliché, I know). I recently did some research on the SMS Seeadler, a WW1 raider captained by Felix Von Luckner (a real badass). I would love to design a ship similar/the same as this. Does anyone know anyone with experience in designing/ building tall ships, or know anywhere I can get more info?
    Thanks, Tallboy
     
  2. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    waikikin Senior Member

    Hi Tallboy,
    I have some experience with tall ships especially in supporting maintenance to a couple, some things I have noted over the years-
    All struggle financially, particularily after a honeymoon of resto/rebuild is over & people move on to the next challenge.
    No one person even if super wealthy captain of industry can support such projects.
    If you like them, jump on board as volunteer or even pay to travel on them, much cheaper or if you're in love with the "idea" buy somthing small & put a clipper bow profile on it, some scroll/trailboards, ratlines, sprit, & a double barrelled name like Black Pearl, Scurvy Dog, Sea treasure..... Flat Broke.... Rum Punch..
    Seriously, support one of the vessels up & running already or it'll be the ruination of yea, sucking the very soul outa the TallBoy. Any good Tall ship usually has a terrific level of comradery & esprit de corps on board, if you don't find it move on.

    Jeff.
     
  3. pdwiley
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    Just how big are you thinking about here? There's a big difference between say a 45' brigantine and a 120' 3 masted square rigger. Plenty of plans available for vessels under 75'.

    Unless you're a multi-millionaire and want to become a pauper, don't do it. I've just spent 3 days at the Tasmanian Wooden Boat festival. Lots (well, some) square riggers and other old boats. Lovely lines, lots of strings to play with, big crews, many dollars to keep afloat.

    As for sail training, your vessel would have to meet current survey requirements. Good luck with that and keeping costs down....

    PDW
     
  4. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Stumble Senior Member

    Tallboy,

    The real problem here is money. It is certainly doable, but a large vessel like this requires a huge amount of ongoing cash, with little no no way to recoup any of it. Realistically I would guess a few million a year in ongoing operational costs, budgeted to return nothing. If you happen to generate some revenue great, but I wouldn't count on it.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    A small square rigger or possibly a topsail schooner or something will be many millions to build, many tens of thousands to design and will cost many tens of thousands to operate and maintain each year. If you have access to these funding levels, you'd already have contacted a NA and started an appropriate SOR for such an adventure. If these funds aren't something you can comprehend, well we know what's going on.

    [​IMG]

    This is available, a relatively new 200', steel hulled build and a modest 5.5 million to purchase. Of course there's a several hundred thousand commission just on the sale, but, hey, welcome to the world of "windjammer" ownership.

    Maybe something more reasonably priced is in order.

    [​IMG]

    Only 120' long, well over a half a century old, so maintenance will be demanding, but yeah an easy 3/4's of a million and it's yours.

    I say go for it and share some photos of your newest venture, when you find a berth large enough to handle it.
     
  6. Tallboy
    Joined: Jan 2015
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    Tallboy Junior Member

    Everybody,
    Thank you so much for all of your answers! It means a lot to me that there are still traditional enthusiasts out here in the world!
    I understand the money problem:( so that kind of deflated me. I did expect it though. I think maybe one day if I win lottery by lucky chance I might do it haha. :)
    Thank you for all your advice and I think I will just go volunteer on a tall ship ha :) however, being an engineer I hope I can still find a job there!
     
  7. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    Tallboy,

    they nearly all carry engines now plus generators, pumps, electrical systems so plenty to keep engineers busy.

    Jeff
     
  8. Tallboy
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    Tallboy Junior Member

    Jeff,
    Thanks for the reply :)
    Maybe my dream will come true then eh? Perhaps one day you might hear of me, or perhaps not. Either way I wish a happy life on anybody who helped me with this:)
     
  9. pdwiley
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    Or you could spend 5-10 years of your life plus at least $100K (assuming you're the world's best scrounger) building one of these.....

    PDW
     

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  10. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Build yourself a bolger light schooner for a couple of thousand dollars. Add a topsail. Put on an eye patch and get a parrot and you will ready to go.
     
  11. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The one thing that increases the cost of training ships enormously are all the new safety regulations.
     
  12. pdwiley
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    No good, not enough strength to carry the weight of the cannon. Let alone absorbing the recoil....

    PDW
     
  13. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    What are these new regulations ?. I had not heard anything.
     
  14. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    What about smaller cannons . 1 each side . Fire both together to remain upright.:)
     

  15. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    waikikin Senior Member

    Or swivel cannons to bow & stern, for active positioning in close quarters manoeuvring...:idea:
     
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