Will this work as a header tank arrangement?

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by BoatingBeginner, Jul 27, 2012.

  1. BoatingBeginner
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    BoatingBeginner New Member

    The usual wet manifold/header tank arrangement looks like this
    [​IMG]

    Bowman make quite an expensive alternative like this
    [​IMG]

    But I found a lower and more elegant solution like this, with the header tank seemingly just integrated into the lower Cummins wet manifold
    [​IMG]

    How is this working? Doesn't the header tank need to be of a certain size?
     
  2. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Noosa.Australia where god kissed the earth.

    pistnbroke I try

    looking at the photos I wonder if you are confusing which part the header tank is as they are not central in your photo...on the blue one I cannot even see a header tank???
     
  3. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    Look under the bonnet of your car!
    Every vehicle manufacturer puts the tank out of the way and connects it with one or two hoses. One is enough, the 2 hose system circulates water through the tank so you can add anti-freeze there. There are low and high markings on the tank, even with a cold engine there is at least 1/3 of the volume present.

    Bowman's integrated header tanks are too small; after the engine has reached operating temperature the spring loaded cap blows off almost the whole content of the tank. If you check the next day you are inclined to fill it again, thinking you have a leak somewhere, but if you don't do that you'll see that the level remains stable near the bottom of the tank.
    I've made coolant sensors for the header tanks but they are useless: the alarm goes within 30 minutes when the engines are running.
     
  4. BoatingBeginner
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    BoatingBeginner New Member

    Thanks very much for that.

    I've found more photos of the same setup. It dates from the mid-80s.

    It seems to be a dry stack exhaust - and may even be keel cooled - not that this would affect the temperatures and pressures of the engine coolant, surely?

    Just all looks so neat.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. CDK
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    CDK retired engineer

    I see rubber hoses connecting pipes, so that's not dry stack!
     

  6. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    it could be, does the raw water inject back into the exhaust anywhere or not?
    It looks like coolant cooled exhaust manifold but dry stack to me?

    Personaly dont like the cooling design as the pressure cap is at or lower than the highest hose on the engine?
    Very small volume header tank so it will be using the overflow tank for sure
     
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