Will a DEEP spade rudder prevent chine tripping ?

Discussion in 'Stability' started by cyclops2, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. cyclops2
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    cyclops2 Senior Member

    Is that a true statement for a constant 23 degree deadrise powerboat?

    I have read that, the deeper the rudder, the more heeling over into the turn direction. Should that be taken as a total elimination of chine tripping on a deep V at up to 40 to 50 mph ?
    Obviously we start slow & keep cutting off small amounts of the bottom of the rudder untill maximum speed sharp turns can be taken.
     
  2. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    Simple answer: NO
     
  3. cyclops2
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    cyclops2 Senior Member

    Ok
    Could you tell me what is causing a chine trip when the hull is leaning 30 to 40 degrees into a high speed turn in about 1' to 1.5' waves ?

    Rich
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The angle of the rudder has a huge influence too.
     
  5. cyclops2
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    cyclops2 Senior Member

    gonzo

    Do you mean the vertical shaft angle if it is not vertical or the front & rear edges ?
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If the shaft is not vertical it influences whether the boat turns bow up or bow up.
     
  7. cyclops2
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    cyclops2 Senior Member

    I asked this question based on the reference material. It could be incorrect.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Depends what you are refering to as chine tripping !!. When a hull is healed over that far how can a chine trip ?? please explain !!!!
    what you are referring to is something else im sure and not chine tripping !!:?:
     
  9. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Need to elabirate a little on this answer !! even i was confussed when i first read it !! so for a non boating type person he wont know what the hell you are talking about !!:confused:
     
  10. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    The angle of the rudder ??? theres need to elabirate on this one as well sorry to be a little picky !:D
     
  11. cyclops2
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    cyclops2 Senior Member

    I thought chine tripping occured when a boat had enough speed in a turn that the boat SLID sideways fast enough so that when a wave struck the chine high enough, the boat would use the sliding momentum to cause a sideways flip. COG above the water line. Power boats.
     
  12. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    If a hull is healing at a 40 degree angle and the chine on the outer high side is far enough out of the water its impossible to trip becasue its completely clear of the water !!.
    Like gonzo will explain i hope the angle of the rudder shaft in relation to the keel is very important and has the effect of digging the back of the hull down or raising the back of the hull up . But he can explain !!!
    The effectiveness and size of the rudder plays a big part in all this and speed as well .

    Chine tripping is something that happened with shallow dead rise ,very flat bottomed hulls where the outter side is just above the water surface and during the bounceing action the outer chine clips the water and digs in !!! and yes will flip the boat or give you one hell of a fright . the best example i can think of is the Glen L Missile hull that has a non trip chine on the last 1/3 of the hull at the rear . The chine has about a 45degree angle on the chine to make the chine lift and ride over the surface of the water and not dig in !!
     
  13. cyclops2
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    cyclops2 Senior Member

    I agree with you.
    baeckmo got me confused with his NO answer.

    I have passengered in 1 small Aluminum OB boat that could be at about 40 mph cut the wheel to the steering stop. That caused a sharp enough lean / heelin that I was pushed down hard enough to exhale. Fantastic safe feeling. 180 degree turn in 3 to 4 seconds we were headed back the opposite way & accelerating to WOT again. :) :) :)
     
  14. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    The following copy appeared in our 1962 catalog: The MISSILE is a bundle of greased lightning compacted into a sleek hull form. The v-drive hulls are without a doubt the fastest type monoplanes available. When powered with the right power plant, the MISSILE will "take off" as if heading for outer space. When handled sensibly, this hull will still be as safe as is possible at the higher speed ranges. The flaring anti-trip chines will prevent tripping on turns, and the wide beam gives positive stability at high speed. Use her as a pleasure craft or ski boat. Whatever the use, the MISSILE is at home in the fast lane.

    I almost built one of these Glen L missile boats way back in 62 but got married instead !! was and still is a stunning looking boat even after all this time !!!:D
     

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  15. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    the same typt of boat

    pic388c.jpg

    pic256g.jpg

    These are the best examples i could find to give you the idea of a anti trip chine and also the absence of deadrise of hulls that used to have tripping problems way back . If this is happen these days designers have learned nothing !!
     
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