Widebeam narrowboat long distance cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Greenseas2, Jul 1, 2007.

  1. Greenseas2
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: USA

    Greenseas2 Senior Member

    Construction

    Several years ago we were contracted to build a floating platform for a government agency. Two of the building restrictions (among others) was, (1) no metalic materials may be used and (2) the deck had to support weight of 500 pounds per square foot. The platform measurements were 30' x 30' x 2'. The solution was to build the platform of plywood and epoxy. The lengthwise 2' wide ply strips were cut half way through at a 1/2 width as were the crosswise strips. They were then slipped together in egg carton fashion with the structure having 1' x 1' x 2' sections . Prior to actual construction, all wood was buttered with epoxy and cured. After assembly, all internal section walls were sealed with thicked epoxy at the joints. The enitre structure was covered, top and bottom, with plywood planking with 2 layers of fiberglass cloth all around and the top finsihed with a non skid surface. The purchasing agency furnished and applied the antifouling material for the bottom. It came in sheets that were adhesive on one side and we have no idea what it was and weren't told despite asking. Part of the contract was a 10 year service and refurbishment of the float clause. When we went to Norfolk two years ago to do the refurbishment, the only action taken was to renew the nonskid surface. Amazingly, the bottom was as clean as the day it was launched. The idea here is that the egg cartoon semi monocoque construction is super strong and can be cut to permit compound curves or flat curves for plywood vessels. I've also seen the same type float built in steel where there were numerous square chambers made and the vessel sheathed in steel. (construction float). The construction method would be ideal for the bottom of a plywood widebeam boat within the proper dimensions of course.
     
  2. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    Build a barge boat for less than $25,000

    Simple buy a used house boat of any size you want that doesnt run, sank etc...

    $15,000 Just hull, superstructure and windows $15,000 -
    I have seen Aluminum, Fiberglass or steel professionally built hulls going for this price

    $3000 Haul out, fix hull and paint
    $2000 Used Outboard Engine 150hp, plenty fast for hull speed
    $5000 Buy everything else on Ebay, swapshops, etc.. used.

    Do all the work yourself...

    All said and down it is a better boat than a box you make yourself. Learn from Noah building a hull takes time and money, buy the shell
    =================================================
     
  3. Greenseas2
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 367
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    Location: USA

    Greenseas2 Senior Member

    Quick and dirty

    The quick and dirty approach can wind up being more expensive than you can imagine. Over the years I've restored several personal boats and even one in good condition requires time and money. A houseboat with a gas engine definitely doesn't fit the long range objectives. Also, any boat that has been submerged requires all new wiring, breaker panels, lights and anything else electric. The price of this will cost more than the hull.

    If you want to see some good craftsmanship in wood boats, take a look at the "New Launchings" in wooden Boat Magazine each month. With a friend or two, modern wooden boats can go together quickly and solidly. If you don't like a wooden hull, use C-Flex fiberglass palnking or use a finely finished wooden hull as a male mold for a fiberglass boat. Almost any construction medium can be used. But reviving a basket case....I don't think so.
     

  4. Greenseas2
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 367
    Likes: 10, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 49
    Location: USA

    Greenseas2 Senior Member

    References

    As a reference point for the widebeam, take a look at Branson Boat design and two boats that they produce. The first is the Emily 43 which appears to be a cross between a Dutch Barge and a widebeam in appearance. (taller superstructure than a pure Dutch barge)The other boat is Branson' 34 foot Dutch Barge design that somewhat parallels Selway Fisher's 32 foot wooden barge. Both would make great long distance cruisers with plenty of living space.
     
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