why masts and not kites on multi's

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by nota, Aug 14, 2013.

  1. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    It sure makes a nice jury rig . . . :)

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
  2. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  3. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I guess it would be a good idea to make the Kite fast to the vessel with a copper conductor, so that you may harness the electrical energy from thunderstorms as you cruise by.................Free energy
     
  4. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    groper Senior Member

    Ive actually experienced that Michael... i was kitesurfing in grey/rainy/squally conditions but never saw any lightning... everytime i jumped, the kite/lines/me charged up through the atmosphere - the bigger the jump and more time in the air, the more charged up - and upon contacting the water again a large amount of static electricity discharged - enough to give me some rather large shocks before i decided it was time to pack up before any lighting decided to show itself... scary stuff...
     
  5. SteveMellet
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    SteveMellet Senior Member

    Hey Groper, takes me back to my teenage years when I used to windsurf with an aluminium mast, going out in thunderstorms to sail the gust fronts. I would sail between the moored keelboats, believing they would take the hit with their taller masts. I'm a little bit older now, and perhaps a little more cautious. Which is kinda weird, as we should be more carefree and stupid the older we get, since we have less time left to live anyway..
     
  6. nota
    Joined: Sep 2012
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    nota Junior Member

    I long ago had a dream/idea of a hydrogen supported kite
    but the size/volume needed is too big to support the weight
    figured was needed at the time to be strong and long lasting

    I donot know is the newer stronger stuff is lighter by enough to matter
    or we need something like carbon nano tube future materials

    light air is another problem that needs work
     
  7. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    They did not say much, but I did post a question.


    http://www.saveol-samdavies.com/default.asp?titre=imokite&mode=news&id=671

    Maybe we will get an answer?

    Wayne
     
  8. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    You found green energy!
     
  9. jonr
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: Great Lakes

    jonr Senior Member

    >A computer control system would need to be perfected

    I agree. There has been some work done on stationary kites to generate electrical power. Fly upwind to depower, wind in some line, then repower and let some line out to turn a generator.

    I predict that changing conditions, launch and retrieval are the big issues.
     
  10. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Two things I noticed,

    These are not the same as the kites used on commercial shipping. They are more like a spinnaker.

    And they do best with a mast .... so you still need an emergency mast.
     
  11. jonr
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    jonr Senior Member

    > and upon contacting the water again a large amount of static electricity discharged - enough to give me some rather large shocks

    A thin breakable line hanging from the kite line that would touch the water before you did would probably solve the problem.
     

  12. tspeer
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    tspeer Senior Member

    Have you ever tried to sail with a kite in light winds? I have an Outleader kite for my boat, and I've rarely had conditions and crew conducive to using it.

    A kite can be comparable in size and cost to a spinnaker. I think they make a good heavy-air alternative to a spinnaker, but they're not yet a viable substitute for a normal sail rig on a cruising-size boat.
     
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