Why I'm Following Sven Yrvind

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by sharpii2, May 7, 2020.

?

Do you believe Sven's latest Ex Lex will make it to New Zeeland.

  1. Nope.

    52.9%
  2. Probably.

    23.5%
  3. Almost certainly.

    23.5%
  1. A II
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

  2. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    That's true.
    Why don't you start a thread called Serendipity?
    Of just call it random sh*t.

    I'm gone, have fun.
     
  3. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Serendipity is an unplanned fortunate discovery by following sidetracks, so it doesn't show up on a thread called serendipity, on a random chip thread it might occur though, however it would have less chance to be related to this thread's topic.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2020
  4. JPE
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    JPE Junior Member

    I'm fully aware of the concept of delayed gratification, and how the individuals proclivity towards it usually predicts success in life.

    To a certain extent delayed gratification will support sustainable happiness, pathological cases are unequivocally excluded.

    You missed the point in my post by a nautical mile. If you wish to adress it, please adress it as a whole.
     
  5. Clarkey
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    Clarkey Senior Member

    Why would I take on board the whole manifesto when, after a lifetime of experience, he keeps on making the same simple mistakes? I think he is in a vicious circle where he lacks confidence in the performance of the boat then massively over-provisions, guaranteeing that the boat will behave like a slug. There are times where I think he is almost on to something then he blows it.

    I wonder how this voyage would have gone if he had actually planned to make the Azores and provisioned accordingly? The boat looked quite slippery in the (obviously inadequate) sailing trials.
     
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  6. KeithO
    Joined: Jul 2019
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    KeithO Senior Member

    I wonder if he thought with the current covid 19 issues, that he may not have any chance of re-supply en-route ? It is a hella long way to NZ, so many people think those stuck in NZ should just sail back to their home country without touching land on the way back, but I would think trips like that are virtually unprecedented.
     
  7. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ the Netherlands

    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    With a little modification I still think ExLex II would make a fine boat for going around the world in shorter legs, I've posted about this on the thread Yrvind in post #615 and #620.
    Well as said, I don't think Sven will go for this, instead in his pre departure post of June 9. 2020 he tells (video start 2:56) to plan for added complexity in his next boat, of which I've posted my thoughts on the thread Yrvind in post #613.
    At the time of this posting Sven's position is about to cross the imaginary line between South Newfoundland and South Biscay, and so is about to leave the Northern North Atlantic, and ± entering the Southern North Atlantic.

    P.S. - I've posted an elaboration on the above in post #144.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2020
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  8. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    To go directly for NZ were pre Covid-19 plans with a planned departure from south west Ireland, leaving from Norway the plans were changed into reaching the Southern North Atlantic and cruise around there till food runs out (the boat was pre Covid-19 already stocked for the trip Ireland - NZ), fresh water stock supplemented by catching rain, and then restock in ± November in eg. Santa Maria in the Azores, and then go for NZ from there.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2020
  9. KeithO
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    KeithO Senior Member

    I dont know how he does it, in the tropics I was dehydrating on less than 5L water per day and he is claiming to use only 1L / day. Maybe the activity level is lower than what I had in the military but one sweats without even moving ?
     
  10. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    You're talking about average fresh water use, Sven uses less than half of the average minimum, and is still doing fine when he rations on that, and he's a very experienced rain catcher who always comes in with enough fresh water.
     
  11. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    No problem at all with sidetracks, Angel, if they don't go on toooo long. I'm absolutely a culprit myself. Its the digression into politics and other contentious subjects that result in testosterone fuelled willy waving (uk colloquialism!) that is less than constructive.

    My teacher father inlaw says 'the red herring is sacred'

    Speaking of red herrings (see what I did there) I was delighted to discover recently that the term originated fromWilliam Cobbett (whose wonderful writings include 'Cottage Economy', 'Rural Rides') who apparently sabotaged hunts by distracting the dogs with the strong smell of a kipper.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2020
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  12. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Thanks Adrian, I'll think it's indeed better now to follow Marc's suggestion in post #107, so I've started a Random Chip Thread for any possible further elaboration about the sidetrack that occurred here, as well as a home for any future sidetracks wherever they might occur, and for all other homeless random chips that wander around over these wonderful forums . . :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2020
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  13. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    For piloting a sailboat which cannot go upwind, he seems to be doing quite well. He has been at sea for over a month and a half and seems to to be heading more or less in the direction he wants to go.

    I imagine the performance of his boat is very similar to that of 16th century ships which brought the first English colonists to America. I suppose they didn't go to windward well either.

    I have heard that they used a "sail and hold" methodology, in which, when the wind was favorable, they sailed. When it was not, they hove to. In the end, they got where they wanted to go. But it could take a l-o-n-g t-i-m-e.

    I'm still kind of curious as to why he can't get his boat to sail upwind. He seems to always have plenty of wind, even for his cut-down rig. And he has three sails to choose from. I wonder if he has tried using the two aft most sails and leaving the forward one furled.

    I don't think he's headed for New Zealand anymore. I think he's planning to hang out in the Sargasso Sea for awhile after he re-provisions. I do know that he enjoys being at sea, which is probably one reason why performance never seems to be at the top of his list of qualities he wants in a vessel.

    Having read his autobiography, I can see that he was treated as an outcast by his society due to learning difficulties. It is disheartening to see how people in modern society are judged on just one criteria: academic achievement (this is, of course, when they're not being judged by skin color and/or gender).

    So, he has not only cast convention aside, but has condemned it for good measure. Doing so, has led him to sometimes not make the best design decisions, but he is a boot-strapping story, if I have ever seen one. Everything he has he has built with his own two hands, including all of the boats he has designed.
     
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  14. JPE
    Joined: Aug 2019
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    JPE Junior Member

    Regarding testing all possible configurations, I bet he's done that. He seems like a very methodological and systematic person.

    What I think is the problem here (well overload of course, but...) is the immersion rate of Exlex Minor. Flat sides mean every extra pound sinks the boat quite much.
     

  15. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    No flare in the sides means the boat keeps sinking at the same rate when extra loading, which is no problem if the total center of gravity is kept low, and the load is balanced along the length of the boat, then the extra load only slows down the boat a bit, especially in light airs.
     
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