Why I'm Following Sven Yrvind

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by sharpii2, May 7, 2020.

?

Do you believe Sven's latest Ex Lex will make it to New Zeeland.

  1. Nope.

    58.3%
  2. Probably.

    25.0%
  3. Almost certainly.

    16.7%
  1. Clarkey
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Clarkey Senior Member

    The Eric Henseval 'Souriceau' is also an interesting boat. More than a metre shorter than Exlex but with, I would argue, more ability.

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
    Posts: 176
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ the Netherlands

    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Eric Henseval'sSouriceau plans are available at DuckWorks.

    [​IMG]

    ‘‘ . . . Souriceau roughly translated means "very young Mouse" . . . ’’

    Lenght over all : 5.00 m - 16' 5"
    Hull lenght : 4.75m - 15' 7"
    Lenght at DWL : 4.75 m - 15' 7"
    Beam max. : 2.20 m - 7' 2.5"
    Draft max. : 1.35 m - 4' 5"
    Draft min. : 0.57 m - 22.5"
    vertical and retractable keel
    2 Berths
    Galley and chart table
    2 coupled tillers : one inside and one outside
    Displacement : 530 kg - 1168 lbs.
    Ballast keel : 120kg - 265 lbs.
    Sail area : 18 m2 - 194 sf
    TRANSPORTABLE, unsinkable
    Built in glass-epoxy-plywood

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2020
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  3. JPE
    Joined: Aug 2019
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    Location: Finland

    JPE Junior Member

    Oh nice! Thanks Clarkey for introducing the Souriceau and A II for extending the info. Now: Henseval and Yrvind represent two very different approaches to minimalistic sailing. I would love to see Sven's commentary on Souriceau, as it bears many elements Sven considers life threatening, to say the least, in his manifesto.

    Souriceau is of course much larger in volume than Exlex or Exlex Minor, but I think that extra volume is necessary to successfully complete the missions Sven is setting out for.
     
  4. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Eric Henseval's Aviateur 5.7 M is a bigger version of his Souriceau.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    (note thicker cushion in drawing to look out of the dome)

    Building material: 9 mm thick marine plywood, glass fiber and epoxy resin.
    Hull lenght: 5.70 m
    Lenght at DWL: 5.70 m
    Lenght over all LOA: 5.95 m
    Beam max: 2.50 m
    Beam max at DWL: 1.9 m
    Fwd freeboard: 0.95 m
    Aft freeboard: 0.81 m
    Draft min/max: 0.66 m / 1.31 m
    Retractable keel with tackle (easy and simple system)
    Lenght from DWL to the head of the mast: 8.88 m
    Engine: outboard from 2 HP to 6 HP
    Mainsail Area: 14.4 m²
    Solent Area: 8.09 m²
    Total Area to windward: 22.5 m²
    Spinnaker Area asymetrical: 27 m²
    Sliding integrated pool (through the watertight anchor locker)
    Displacement: empty 625 kg — half load 837.5 kg — full load 1,050 kg
    CAN BE WELL LOADED FOR BIG NAVIGATIONS
    Keel ballast: 230 kg with 200 kg of bulb
    Unsinkable with flotation foam under berthes
    Transportable
    Beachable
    European Conception Category: C3 D4
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2020
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  5. Clarkey
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Clarkey Senior Member

    Yes, it is all swings and roundabouts I suppose - a boat that can't make to windward even in benign conditions is life threatening as far as I am concerned. Henseval goes smaller too - the Inseperable 398. But these are just examples - people have been sailing boats with similar features across oceans for decades. Sailing, not just drifting in a more or less controlled way.
     
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  6. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ the Netherlands

    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Henseval's Inseparable 398 is not an ocean going boat, and the design is limited by Italian tax laws that only apply there, the design was commissioned by an Italian client for the lagoon of Venice and Lake Como use, hull length < 4 m = no sailboat tax in Italy.

    Hull length: 3.98 m
    Length at DWL: 3.98 m
    LOA: 4.77 m
    Max beam: 2.00 m
    Beam max at DWL: 1.55 m
    Freeboard Fwd: 0.77 m
    Freeboard aft: 0.64 m
    Draft min/max: 0.19 m / 0.96 m
    Air draft: 7.89 m
    Outboard engine: 2 hp to 5 hp
    Mainsail: 14.5 m²
    Gennaker: 7.8m²
    Total sail area to windward: 14.5 m²
    Displacement: 387 kg — max loaded 635 kg
    Ballast keel weight: 113 kg lead — iron possibility too
    Unsinkable with foam and wood for a total of 558 liters of flotation
    Transportable / Beachable / Pivoting mast to set up mast quickly alone
    European category: C2 D3

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    In the same category I would go for the Bedard Yacht Yesign15' RoG Micro Cruiser

    LOA: 15.3' — 4.66 m
    Beam: 5.75' — 1.75 m
    Draft board up: 6" — 15 cm
    Draft board down: 3' 10" — 1.17 m
    Displacement: 975 lb — 443 kg
    Light ship: 450 lb — 205 kg
    Sail area: 150 sq ft — 14 m²

    [​IMG]

    RoG launched in France, capsize test, boat not 100% as per plans, see link.

     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2020
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  7. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    I would like to see someone spend 30 days, let alone 60 on the open sea in one these three speed machines. They are most likely seaworthy, but even more likely not sea kindly. Also, if anything breaks, especially the drop keel, the boat would most likely be rendered helpless or worse. Their payloads seem to be too limited for anything other than a quick dash across the sea. God help the crew if anything goes wrong.

    Sven's boats have stayed at sea for relatively long periods of time. He likes it out there. He would be the last in the world to want to do a quick dash across an ocean to impress anyone.

    But these three speedster are good in there own right.
     
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  8. CT249
    Joined: May 2003
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    CT249 Senior Member

    There's zero chance a boat that is much shorter, much fatter, has a much draggier stern and much heavier than a Laser or Windmill could approach their speed.

    The people who design raceboats are not fools, and there's damn good reasons they don't use tumblehome just above a flat chine.

    Why would a crab claw sail spill wind better than the rigs that a whole bunch of very smart people have spent many decades developing?

    Developing vertical lift from a sail is normally a less efficient way of moving a craft than developing forward thrust.

    A rudder post about five times as long as the tiller and heavily inclined will cause enormous weight in the helm, as well as problems in keeping the rudder at the correct horizontal angle if the boat ever achieves any significant speed.
     
  9. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    My reasoning here is not to suggest that there aren't faster, more efficient sail plans or that the Crab Claw is better than a Bermuda rig. Strictly defined, I'm not even sure that my design, which isn't original to me, is a proper Crab Claw rig.

    The idea is to be able to tilt the sail independently of the hull so the hull stays upright when spilling excess air. This would maintain the best cross sectional form for planing over the surface of the water.

    I took the idea originally from wind surfers who held the world's speed record for many years in the eighties. Now, the sail rocket uses a similar configuration.
    [​IMG]

    The rudder idea was just a way of having a single device that would serve as both a steering rudder and auxiliary power. Weight savings.

    I don't know what tumblehome means, but it sounds like you are referring to the chine rising at the bow.

    I don't know why the stern would be draggy.

    I am in the habit of assuming that no matter how many great minds have applied themselves to complex problems, there is always room for learning and possible improvement, not that my ideas represent that. Just no reason to accept the current state as perfection. History has proven that position is often wrong.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     
  10. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ the Netherlands

    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Agree to the post, with two remarks;

    I only saw two Henseval fast mini ocean cruisers on the thread in post #181-182 and in post #184, as the one in post #185-186 isn't intended for ocean cruising, but maybe the Mini Transat 6.50 (Maxi 650) in post #177 is also meant here ?

    For any help that might be needed it alas has become common to carry at least one bucket full of EPIRBs, and rely on that to try to call in other humans first for help, who then can risk their lives for a rescue and also have to spend money from public funds to do so. If that doesn't work then maybe they leave their salvation up to some Gods, or just jury rig the damn thing, as they should have done in the first place.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2020
  11. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ the Netherlands

    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Tumblehome is inward angled Flare in the hull sidesQuora info

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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  12. JPE
    Joined: Aug 2019
    Posts: 67
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    Location: Finland

    JPE Junior Member

    How often do boats drop their keels? And, how common is it for a sailboat to capsize and remain inverted?
     
  13. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ the Netherlands

    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Both depends on design and use, the Dutch yacht designer and builder Frans Maas died that way in 2017 with his own boat, taking some others along with him.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2020
  14. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ the Netherlands

    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Last edited: Sep 1, 2020

  15. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    The 1996 Vendee Globe saw Thierry Dubois and Tony Bullimore both capsize and remain inverted, which prompted the development of the IMOCA designs I believe. Bullimore lost his keel, Dubois didn't, IIRC
     
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