why don't sailboats have wheelhouses/cabins?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by thaikarl, Aug 30, 2009.

  1. Brent Swain
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    Brent Swain Member

    Unlike cockpits, wheelhouses don't have to be self draining , so seating in them can be much lower.
     
  2. Chickadee
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    Chickadee Junior Member

    why don't sailboats have wheelhouses/cabins ?

    Here's a video to illustrate the problem...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iA2f17anxjk

    Go to 2:35 don't you feel better now ?

    Boat size is really the problem here I believe M. Sponberg is right. Below 12-15m the thing is too proeminent for correct upwind performance
     
  3. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    too much sail pressing the forefoot down = wet ride ...
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Wheel houses that are not self bailing have to be closed even in moderately rough weather. In the tropics or summer that can be unbearable unless you have A/C. That means running a generator nonstop
     
  5. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    IMO it makes no difference whether the companionway decends into the salon or into a wheelhouse, so the normal rules apply depending on the vessel and how you assess the risk.

    To windward the fwd windows will be closed but you'd usually leave the companionway door/drop boards open until the conditions get really severe. Even then with dorades and blowers you can still ensure copious quantities of fresh air.
    Aft cockpits are more prone to being pooped then mid and even then only when running. Heavy double enders seem to be more prone to this so it's going to depend very much on the situation.


    But who wants to sail in the tropics :)
     
  6. TollyWally
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    TollyWally Senior Member

    Are we still having this debate? I think it's horses for courses. I had a very nice outing here in northern climes this weekend. The stove was burning merrily and the coffee was hot. Had the door slid open to bleed off a little heat during the warmer part of the day, it was nice to slide it closed as the sun set. I've paid my dues in atrocious weather in my youth. I prefer heat and some enclosure vs wool and raingear, but that's just me. I wouldn't impose my values on those with a more rugged and robust outlook, nor would I join them willingly. :)
     
  7. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Crag,
    As per the Moody 45DS stability curve it seems the designer has considered the deck saloon as a watertight volume to calculate the KN curves.
    Do you know if those sliding doors comply with ISO 12216:2002? I would be amazed if they can be considered as watertightness degree 1 and strong enough to resist an inversion.
    Nauticats manufacturer told me some of their models cannot be A categorized because of the sliding doors at the sides of the wheelhouse (too low flooding point then).

    Cheers.
     
  8. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    But aren't they only temporary immersed
    "3.20.1
    degree of watertightness 1
    protection against effects of continuous immersion in water
    3.20.2
    degree of watertightness 2
    protection against effects of temporary immersion in water
    "

    so degree 2 should be enough for self rightening vessels? And the following..
    -Design pressure 70 kPa on decks (ie hatches), 18kPa on cabin sides (sliding side doors) and 12kPa backside of the cabin (companionways)
    -Determination of degree of watertightness (ie waterjet test)

    and further.. the standard doesn't describe test for watertightness class 1 so how it could be verified??
     
  9. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Thanks Teddy.
    Yes, perhaps degree 2 may be considered for a selfrighting boat.
    But I have serious doubts about that big and seemingly weak sliding door being able to resist a full inversion. Anyother has more info about this?

    Have you found a manufacturer of watertight sliding doors for recreational boats, Teddy? We went on this issue some time ago at the STIX and the Seaworthiness threads
     
  10. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    None so far..
     
  11. AlexMorozov
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    AlexMorozov Custom yachts

    Hi, no watertight sliding door, but the pilothouse available.
    Soler 34 MS 1-1.jpg
     
  12. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Hi Alex!
    I do not understand what you do mean by: "no watertight sliding door, but the pilothouse available". Could you please clarify?

    Do you now of any manufacturer for watertight sliding doors to degree 1 or 2 for the recreational market?
     
  13. AlexMorozov
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    AlexMorozov Custom yachts

    I suppose that sliding door can not be watertight at all.
    The picture of my new concept boat (with pilothouse).
     
  14. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    watertight sliding doors

    Guillermo, found this: http://www.pointeng.co.uk/marinedivision.asp


    From the site:

    Watertight sliding doors
    Sliding watertight doors for pneumatic or electrical operation are approved by the MCA for Large Commercial, Sailing and Motor Vessels up to 80m load line length and will withstand a 4 metre column of water from both sides. A60 class fire rated and non-rated doors are available. Please call us to discuss your requirements.
     
    1 person likes this.

  15. Dryfeet
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    Dryfeet Junior Member

    Give me protection from the wind and spray anytime all the while I'm enjoying a great view! Good for the Admiral too!
     

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