Who uses AIS?

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by cthippo, Oct 20, 2010.

  1. fairbank56
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    fairbank56 Junior Member

    ALL US vessels traveling to or communicating with a foreign port must have a station license, including voluntary/recreational vessels. Voluntary vessels do not need a license if simply traveling in international waters but if you enter a foreign port or transmit to a foreign station, you must have one. You must also have an operator permit when traveling to a foreign port. This is all clearly stated on the FCC website as well as in title 47 part 80 of FCC regulations.

    Eric
     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well, thats a neat idea, bravo!:D
     
  3. cthippo
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    cthippo Senior Member

    Remind me to look up the definition of a vessel.

    I monitor 16 when I go kayaking (mostly so it's set there if I need to call for help) and around here it's a tossup who's going to respond to a mayday between Vancouver, Victoria and Port Angeles Coast Guard.
     
  4. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    According to international agreements it is not allowed to use VHF marine band when ashore. For good reason.

    In the same context, a vessel is anything afloat. When equipped with VHF, a license is mandatory. (even when the equipment is not in use)

    There are (as always) US rules and regulations which are not in line with the international ones, but one has to take care when sailing the "rest" of the world.

    Same is valid for skippers permits. Many USanians pay hefty fines in Europe every year, assuming they donĀ“t need licenses. They do, all over the world, like all of us.
     
  5. fairbank56
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    fairbank56 Junior Member

    FCC part 80.5 Definitions

    Ship or vessel. Ship or vessel includes every description of watercraft
    or other artificial contrivance, except aircraft, capable of being used
    as a means of transportation on water whether or not it is actually
    afloat.

    Eric
     
  6. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I have a merchant mariner friend who really dislikes AIS transponders on small, recreational vessels.

    He says it is a big annoyance for him to come into harbor with a "bazillion" small AIS targets on his screen, blocking his view of the important (read big) traffic.

    Just an input from a merchant mariner. He's not going to be altering course coming into the harbor for your 21ft (7meter) sailboat anyway, so get out of the way! :)
     
  7. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    What I say...............

     
  8. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I saw your post. Just more data supporting your point of view. :D
     
  9. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    So where do you think the size cutoff should be?
     
  10. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Not size, experience.

    When a full licensed master is in command, I see no need for restrictions. On the average boat with extremely inexperienced and often drunk ****** in command, a transponder should not be allowed. A receiver of course.

    The size comes into account automatically with larger vessels. Once you are past a certain point you need professional crew anyway. And then class A equipment is mandatory.
     
  11. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Well, it wont be Victoria, there isn't even a Coast Guard Lifeboat based here!

    Not likely Vancouver unless you get the hovercraft.

    Much more likely Port Angeles in their Dolphin helicopter if a "vessel of opportunity" doesn't help you out first.

    -Tom
     
  12. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    Actually, just the CG radio stations. I've actually heard all three trying to respond to the same distress call. Was a bit of a mess to say the least.
     
  13. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    you do know that since GMDSS became mandatory (Feb 1992) for most commercial vessels there is no longer a requirement to monitor Ch16
    feel safer now?
     
  14. fairbank56
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    fairbank56 Junior Member

    Mandatory ships did not have to be fully compliant with GMDSS until Feb of 1999 but they still were required to monitor channel 16 until Feb of 2005. In the US, the coast guard still monitors channel 16. In addition, all ships in the US over 20 meters in length must monitor bridge to bridge channel 13, so this is the channel to use if you need to hail a ship to get her intentions or give yours when navigating around them.

    Eric
     

  15. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    You are correct
    my mistake
     
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